Inside the GSA – a Case Study of user-centered Agile in a high-profile government agency

This unique journey will transport you deep inside the world of the General Services Administration (GSA) Integrated Award Environment (IAE).  You will see how user-centered Agile is transforming the way software applications are engineered, how users' voices have been integrated with large-scale Agile development, and what issues we encountered along the way.

When Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, predicted, "Everything in the future online is going to look like a multiplayer game," perhaps he was envisioning a user community such as ours.  The IAE family of software applications have more than a million users representing federal, state, local, and tribal government organizations; congressional staff; large and small businesses; universities, schools, and hospitals; non-profit organizations; foreign entities; private citizens and others.  Our greatest challenge is the diversity of our user base, resembling a massive multiplayer game in many ways. 

This case study looks inside a major reengineering effort to migrate 10 legacy applications into an integrated environment while at the same time transitioning from Waterfall to Agile development.  It tells the story of how IAE users have shaped our transformation thus far.  

 

 

 
 

Outline/structure of the Session

This is a new presentation chronicling the ongoing transformation of 10 interdependent policy-driven applications into a user-centered award environment.  It walks you through IAE's journey using real examples, highlighting lessons learned, and generalizing concepts your program can easily adapt.

You will gain insight into how IAE:

  • Determined a user-centered design (UCD) approach was their only acceptable option
  • Adapted UCD methods to fit the demands and constraints of their environment
  • Manages continuous user engagement, data capture, and analysis
  • Integrates user input and analysis processes with the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe)*
  • Is making a difference for the entire Federal Government with its UCD practices

* SAFe and Scaled Agile Framework are registered trademarks of Scaled Agile, Inc.

Learning Outcome

You will learn through the experiences of the Integrated Award Environment team at GSA:

  • Why user-centered design (UCD) matters for policy-driven applications, just as it does for consumer applications
  • How we adapted personas and other UCD aids to represent a complex user community with dozens of different job functions
  • How we streamlined ethnography-based data collection and analysis  - engaging a wide variety of people within the resource and schedule constraints of our software development program
  • How we infused the voices of users at the portfolio, program, and team levels of the Scaled Agile Framework

Target Audience

Program and Project Managers, Agile Coaches, Software Architects and Designers, User Experience Professionals, Requirements Analysts

Requirements

A projector for wide-format slides.

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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