We often talk about what the Product Owner Must "Do" - they must own the Product Backlog, they must manage the product backlog and the priorities, they must refine the backlog, they must answer the team's questions.

We very rarely talk about what the Product Owner must "Be".

During this session I will highlight what I have learned from my experience as a Product Owner and a Product Owner coach, what I believe are the main Must "Be's" for a Product Owner.

 
 

Outline/structure of the Session

Following is outline of my talk:

  • Opening and Introduction
  • Review what a Product Owner is
  • Overview of a Product Owner's characteristics or "Being"
  • Overview of the 3 hybrid elements
  • Compensating for the missing elements: a few examples
  • Q&A

An Innovative Product Owner is a:

  • Vision Keeper
  • Story Teller
  • Single Source of Truth 

The best Product Owners have several key characteristics in common that help them become great Innovative Product Owners.

  • Engaged
  • Available
  • Decisive
  • Empowered
  • Knowledgeable
  • Foresightful
  • Collaborative
  • Part of the team

What’s more, certain characteristics combinations yield hybrid characteristics, much like an eloquent speaker endowed with charisma can make a powerful politician.

  • Engagement + Availability = Trust
  • Decisiveness + Empowerment = Leadership
  • Knowledge + Foresight = Vision 

Learning Outcome

  1. Understanding a Product owner
  2. Characteristics that are in a great Product Owner’s DNA
  3. Impact of entangling these characteristics
  4. Stories and examples on how to counteract the lack of these elements.

Target Audience

Product Owners, ScrumMasters, Transformation Teams, Scrum Teams

Requirements

 

Several round tables for working sessions and conversation

Flip charts, stickies and sharpies for each table

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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