Following Your Fear: How to do the things you've always wanted to do

What stops you from doing the things you’ve always wanted to do? What stops teams from being truly great? What hinders most Agile transformations?

 

Fear.

 

That feeling in your gut when deep down you know what you need to do, but you're not sure if you can do it.

 

Check out any of the “x things most successful people do” posts online. Every single one of them will mention fear. Why? Because fear can either energize you to success or paralyze you into inaction.

 

I’ll show you how to move from paralysis to action and how you can apply these techniques to yourself and to your Agile teams. How you, as a coach, can create safe environments so that your teams can be fearless.

 

In addition, we'll work hands on with the Fear Follower Canvas to help you move those things you want to do from the someday pile to done!

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The first half of the session will be an interactive talk delving into what fear is, where it comes from, how people have dealt with it and how it intersects with Agile transformations. I'll be referencing works from such people as, Susan Jeffers, David Bayles, Ted Orland, Simon Sinek, Keith Johnstone, Del Close, and Eliyahu Goldratt.

The second half will be an exercise where the participants will use the Fear Follower Canvas themselves to tackle the things they've been wanting to do.

 

Here is some of the user feedback from the previous times it has been presented:

 

"Great lecture, very fun, motivating, and thought provoking"

"Concrete examples of discussed concepts"

"Immediate benefits seen from exercises"

Learning Outcome

Understanding the different ways in which fear manifests

Understanding how it can contribute to "action paralysis"

How to use the Fear Follower Canvas to break through those blocks

Target Audience

Those whose keep talking about what things they should be doing, but aren't actually getting them done (at an individual level, team level, or organizational level)

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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