Found In Translation - Building Alliances Through Analogies

Meaningful analogies, through words and imagery can help transform an individual’s mindset.  Explore relatable parallels and impressionable pictures that help any cynic overcome self-imposed mental barriers around Agile. Discuss techniques for better assessing your audience and catering your communication accordingly. Use real life comparisons and relative material to challenge your listener’s world of familiarity and preconceived notions. Help launch Agile-foreigners and skeptics into a heightened sense of realizations and theories around Lean concepts and Agile specific principles.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

 I. SPRINT ZERO – Opening and Self Introduction: 5 MIN

  1. Inaugural Preamble
  2. High Level Introduction
  3. Product Vision/Objectives

II. AUDIENCE EXERCISE ONE – First Impressions Icebreaker: 7 MIN

(Will reveal initial observations and assessments of those around us and bring awareness to implications of judging a book by its cover. BUZZER WILL BE SOUNDED FOR EACH TIMEBOXED EVENT)

  1. Each person is asked to write an assumption about at least three of their tablemates on separate post-it notes and then supply those post-it notes to their rightful subjects. The tablemates are discouraged from talking to one another during this time. They must solely rely on their observations and interactions with their neighbors thus far.
  2. Go around the table and take turns reading your collection of post-it notes and discuss the accuracy of the assumptions.
  3. Volunteers will be asked to share the overall results of the exercise with the entire room. The experience can be about both correct and faulty assumptions that the volunteer either distributed or received.

III. SPEAKER PROFILE - Welcoming Changing Requirements - 9 MIN

(While this section will undoubtedly reveal who I am professionally and personally, that is not the motive behind the topic. The details I share will be described in parallel to images that resemble some of the Agile occurrences we’re all familiar with. The intent is to have the audience consider some of their own personal experiences and how they can use those in future conversations. This will be a live example of how to use life events as analogies that are relatable to the fundamentals of Scrum.)

  1. Professional Roadmap
    1. Pre-Adulting Job
    2. Adulting career path
    3. Common denominator of being successful in multitude of roles
  2. Personal Journey
    1. Initial Backlog
    2. Adapting to Change
    3. Retrospection of Lessons Learned

IV. TRANSFORMING MINDSETS - Techniques for connecting with your listeners: 8 MIN

  1. Relative Satire
  2. Audience Analysis and Comparative Communicating
  3. Common Ground Themes

V. AUDIENCE EXERCISE TWO – Person of Interest Analogy Lab: 15 MIN

(Workshop that will focus on collaboratively assessing a person of interest and using collective knowledge based on the identified traits. Each team will be challenged to talk about their assumptions and derive one appropriate analogy and one that is unfitting. Teams should be able to explain their thought process in addition to sharing their analogies.  BUZZER WILL BE SOUNDED FOR EACH TIMEBOXED EVENT)

  1. Each table should send a volunteer to the front of the room where they will pull cards from multiple hats. Those cards will be brought back and used to define the table’s Person of Interest (POI). One table may end up with a divorced republican boater while another may end up with a Buddhist doctor of three kids.
  2. The tablemates should discuss their POI and share their insights and knowledge about the traits that POI may possess.
  3. A Scrum Principle or Ceremony will be selected by the table. Each table is responsible for writing a good and bad analogy for their POI.
  4. Tables will volunteer to introduce the rest of the room to their POI and read aloud their good and bad analogy and discuss their rationalization for each.

VI. WRAP UP: 1 MIN

  1. Thank you
  2. Contact Information

Learning Outcome

I. Techniques to connect with and cater to your audience

II. Increase collection of real life analogies that can be used in future conversations around Agile principles

III. Identify common obstacles ahead of time so that you can be ready to speak to them

Target Audience

Anyone driving or taking part in the adoption of Agile that has been met with resistance

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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