Agile Governance for Agile Adults – Grow up and give the Enterprise Real not Relative Data

Agile cost money just like waterfall does. Your software labor costs will be all internal (no vendors), all external (only vendors) or a mix. Paying for software labor by the billable hour means no connection to delivered business value and if vendors are using fixed pricing methods, hidden premiums may unnecessarily inflate your costs.

 This 45 minute interactive discussion includes how two organizations focus on quantitative sizing analytics and estimation best practices and how their Enterprise Managers today manage & reduce costs, improve predictable delivery and quantify business value. These Enterprises are investing tens of millions of dollars in Agile implementations at scale and need non-relative (normalized) data that is meaningful instead of relative aggregation of team level measures. Learn how they are adopting program and portfolio level measures and metrics to have real conversation about business value delivered.

 

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Introduction to the lack of software labor cost transparency versus value delivered
  • Open Q&A on audiences experience with software labor costs: internal (your employees), external (outsourced vendors) or a mix.
  • Discussion on the hidden risk premium vendors build into their fixed pricing using software analytics to get the upper hand in negotiations.
  • Examples on how a Fortune 500 and a Major Gov Agency pay staffing vendors not by the billable hour but by measured value delivered.
  • Run through a simulated software spend analysis on a $50 million dollar budget expenditure is performed in real-time to demonstrate key principles and practices. Calculator available for your use post-talk.

Learning Outcome

Understand how sizing analytics quantify business value.

Learn how estimation best practices improves predictable delivery.

Target Audience

Agile Coaches, Agile Program Managers, Product Managers, Stakeholders, C-level executives

schedule Submitted 11 months ago

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  • SHEILA D. DENNIS
    By SHEILA D. DENNIS  ~  11 months ago
    reply Reply

    Relevant subject by seasoned professional - looking forward to it!

  • Harrison Zipkin
    By Harrison Zipkin  ~  11 months ago
    reply Reply

    Sounds excellent!


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