Empowerment. All of the agile literature focuses on it being a key characteristic of a successful Product Owner. Necessary to ensure decisions can be made quickly and representative of business value. Yet in most environments, particularly in the public sector, the notion of a single Product Owner empowered to represent the multitude of stakeholders isn't feasible. In this session, if you have a situation where you are a Product Owner, or know a Product Owner, who is not in that ideal textbook situation (and even those who are), learn how we can harness the power of classic and emerging innovation methods to put you in a position of success.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Discuss the classic characteristics of a Product Owner
  • What is the reality of the Product Owner role often times
  • Alternatives to Product Owner
    • Value Teams
    • X-Teams
    • End-Users
  • Survey of Innovation Methods (with activities)
    • Design Thinking
    • Lean Startup
    • Business Model Canvas
  • Incorporating Innovation Methods into Product Ownership

Learning Outcome

  • Understand alternatives to the traditional Product Owner paradigm
  • Learn how innovation methods can be injected into traditional agile processes by Product Owners

Target Audience

Product Owners, Enterprise Agile Coaches

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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