While there are many examples of Agile  methodologies being used in government, the number of agencies realizing success from it is much lower. A recent survey of Federal CIOs shows that while over 90 percent of respondents reported some form of Agile adoption, 50 percent believe they are ineffective at implementing Agile.

So why the gap? If agencies can stand it up, why are they stumbling to realize the promises of Agile?

Understanding this gap and the reasons causing agencies to stumble will help you to recognize similar issues impeding Agile adoption, understand ways to address those challenges, and reflect on your own journey transitioning to Agile. 

This presentation will address these questions by telling the story of ongoing Agile adoption within the IRS around a large-scale IT modernization project. It will describe the organizational characteristics that challenged Agile adoption and integration, and share lessons learned through our Agile journey to date.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Introduction to our Agile journey
  2. Challenges in existing IRS processes
  3. The 'Why' approach to Agile
  4. Key lessons learned
  5. Where we are going
  6. Questions

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the factors causing federal agencies to stumble with Agile adoption
  • Recognize similar issues impeding Agile adoption
  • Understand ways to address those challenges
  • Share your own journey transitioning to Agile 

Target Audience

Program Managers, Government

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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