The Agile Manifesto says, "Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools," but what I increasingly see in practice is "Tools are the Process, mediating all Interactions between Individuals."  Two years ago, I pointed out the dangers of letting planning tools take over your planning meetings.  I didn't realize that they could take over standups and even intra-team communication as well!

This talk will show how to get out of the Wholly Tool-Focused trap by (1) clarifying the questions your team should be asking about your process and tools and (2) presenting alternative physical tools with a proven track record.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

1) Introduction: Tools, Processes, Interactions, Individuals

2) Why computerized tools are great

3) Why computerized tools are terrible

4) What to ask about changes in your process

5) Analog options and their advantages

6) Getting out of the WTF trap

7) Conclusion: Where you should start tomorrow

Learning Outcome

Participants will learn to see where tools are holding them back instead of helping them, and how to get out of the Wholly Tool-Focused trap.

Target Audience

Anyone in any role who's sick of fiddling with [insert tool here] in planning meetings, standups, and daily work. Anyone not yet sick, but who wants to be.

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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