schedule Oct 16th 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM place Executive Boardroom people 23 Attending
We often look to our engineering teams first to drive efficiency and speed to deliver but as we optimize the flow of our development processes we quickly create pressure in the organizational workflow with the activities that feed into and out of product delivery.  Product definition struggles to keep pace and establish a queue of viable options to pull from.  Marketing efforts begin to pile up as features release faster than we can share the news.  All of this stems from optimizing only one part of the overall system.  In this talk we will look at how to scale Kanban practices to the entire organization to provide the visibility, flexibility and predictability to make every part of the business truly agile.  
 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Intro to Systems Thinking 
  • Story of Enterprise Kanban Rollout
  • How we gained: Visibility through kanban boards
    • Status
    • Input 
    • Accountability
  • How we gained: Predictability through limiting work in progress
    • Satisfaction
    • Dependencies
    • Flow
  • How we gained: Flexibility through stand ups across the business
    • Options
    • Adaptability
    • True Agility
  • Bringing it all together
    • Discovery Kanban
    • Delivery Kanban

Learning Outcome

This talk will provide the audience with a high level look at an alternate way of scaling lean & agile practices that will benefit the entire business.  

Target Audience

Any one interested in the least-resistance path scaling agile to all parts of the business.

schedule Submitted 4 months ago

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