5 Steps to Disruptive Innovation with Hyper-Performing Teams

For too many organizations, Agile is primarily seen as merely an IT delivery system. Within this archaic and limited mindset, New Product Development is so manageable with Scrum. We amble along with 30-day Sprints, a single product owner, a neat product backlog, and a collocated Scrum team. But, today’s business environment is a tsunami of global hyper competition, with companies entering and being forced off the S&P 500 every 15 years. The classic Innovator's Dilemma is now even more pressing, and quite candidly, archaic Agile is of limited use.

 To be competitive now, organizations need to look at the gestalt ... the entire value-stream of activities that are required to bring solutions to market. In this session, we will show concrete examples of how major organizations have innovated along the full path from product ideation to requirements to budgeting to delivery and to operations. Each part of a typical value-stream will be explored to show how agility has impacted these traditionally silo'ed functions and how forward-thinking organizations have reached the next level of performance through tight integration and agile thinking.

Learn the essential steps to conquer the entire value-stream from the “fuzzy front end” of innovation, product discovery, lean experimentation, and modern requirements discovery, to pipeline management, to agile budgeting and incremental funding, to high-performance product-centric teams, and enabling agile engineering techniques.

The result is the architecture of an entire organizational system that is designed to rapidly and effectively discover what customers want and delivery with utmost efficiency.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

I. Introduction (5 Minutes). I'll present on the notion of disruptive innovation, first introduced by Clayton Christiansen.

II. 5 Step to Disruptive Innovation (30 Minutes). We'll segue into the five steps I've distilled:

  1. Innovation Pipeline Management

Learn how to apply Lean to innovation pipeline management at the portfolio level through selecting experiments, managing multiple projects to deliver against them, and pivoting, persevering or terminating initiatives.   Case studies from Nationwide Insurance and Spirit Airlines will show how these techniques can be implemented within an established enterprise.

  1. Agile Budgeting and Incremental Funding

 Yearly budgeting is a time-consuming and arduous process that locks us into a wasteful rigid cycle that often leads to the wrong things being done, with an illusion of control. Learn how to institute quarterly, rolling forecasts that facilitate dynamic funding. A case study from American Express will provide clear insight.

  1. High Performance Standing Teams

 Learn how to set up high performance, standing Scrum teams, with parallels to modern Lean “work cells” in order to give a deeper understanding of the principles that drive great teams, and highlight the responsibilities of those that manage and help create them.   Case studies from OPower and The Motley Fool will show these techniques operating within both a rapidly growing startup and an established organization.

  1. Product Discovery and Lean Experimentation

 Traditional product management is often short on innovation and long on waste. How can you create a sustainable, flexible and innovative product delivery process that keeps you in at the forefront of your market and delights your customers? Learn the core philosophies, techniques and responsibilities behind leading product design and management techniques from disciplines including user experience design, Lean UX and Lean Startup.

  1. High Performance Agile Engineering

 Explore the underlying agile engineering concepts necessary to implement the Lean principle of “jidoka” (or “autonomation”). Specific advice on implementing core engineering techniques such as automated build, automated testing and continuous delivery will be explored, with examples on various technology platforms illustrated through case studies from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Symantec.

III. Table Discussion & Wrap-up.  We'll finish the session with a table discussion on the 5 steps to keep things interactive and productive.

Learning Outcome

  1. Innovation Pipeline Management

Learn how to apply Lean to innovation pipeline management at the portfolio level through selecting experiments, managing multiple projects to deliver against them, and pivoting, persevering or terminating initiatives.  

  1. Agile Budgeting and Incremental Funding

 Learn how to institute quarterly, rolling forecasts that facilitate dynamic funding.

  1. High Performance Standing Teams

 Learn how to set up high performance, standing Scrum teams, with parallels to modern Lean “work cells” in order to give a deeper understanding of the principles that drive great teams, and highlight the responsibilities of those that manage and help create them.  

  1. Product Discovery and Lean Experimentation

Learn the core philosophies, techniques and responsibilities behind leading product design and management techniques from disciplines including user experience design, Lean UX and Lean Startup.

  1. High Performance Agile Engineering

Learn the underlying agile engineering concepts necessary to implement the Lean principle of “jidoka” (or “autonomation”). Specific advice on implementing core engineering techniques such as automated build, automated testing and continuous delivery will be explored, with examples on various technology platforms illustrated through case studies from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Symantec.

 

Target Audience

executives, managers, team leads, scrum masters project managers, product owners

Prerequisite

Basic knowledge of Scrum.

schedule Submitted 2 months ago

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