Facebook Agile: From Green to Greener, plus other lies and bull$#!t

schedule Oct 16th 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM place Room 5 people 14 Attending

All companies tell lies. All executives endorse lies. And all employees live lies.

We must pretend we are amazing, and brag to our peers about how much farther ahead we are, than they are. We change the narrative to suit our lies. We have reports to prove our lies.

This happens at EVERY company.

When you look at Facebook feeds – all you see is pictures of vacations. Smiling kids. BBQs. Clean pools. You never see the miserable couple, the dirty laundry, or the crying kids.

Enter Facebook Agile.

We are conditioned to hide the bad $#!t that is going on around us. There’s no reason anyone has to know what’s really going on (even though most people know what’s going on).

Our leaders are afraid of what other peers might think. Or worse, what other “senior management” might perceive or judge. So they choose not to be leaders, despite the obvious need for leadership.

This session will provide an experience report on what leaders can do to embrace transparency, trust, and courage. Building a culture of continuous improvement starts with embracing the things that aren't working, instead of hiding them to avoid overhead.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Review of Agile Principles - what do we aspire to embrace?
  • Status Reports - and whether they tell the truth?
  • Motivations behind the lies we tell at work
  • Why your Facebook feed is bull$#!t
  • Why your status report is probably bull$#!t too
  • Leadership, and why leaders lack it
  • How Leaders can be the single greatest impact to culture - for better or worse
  • Embracing a culture of truth telling
  • Using Retrospectives at Scale to promote courage and trust
  • Leadership Retrospectives - putting leaders in a position to lead
  • Review of Agile Principles - Actions speak louder than status reports

Learning Outcome

  • How to embrace a culture of truth telling
  • Using retrospectives at scale to help leaders, lead
  • Creating a culture of continuous learning and improvement with Leadership Retrospectives
  • Accelerating success by sharing failures
  • Pair Programming for Executives

Target Audience

Leaders, Executives, and the folks who lie to make them happy.

Prerequisite

People who attend this session should have experience completing or reading status reports that say everything is fine (and green), knowing full well things haven't been fine (or green) in months.

Anyone who has told a lie to avoid overhead at work.

schedule Submitted 6 months ago

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  • George Dinwiddie
    By George Dinwiddie  ~  3 months ago
    reply Reply

    Your abstract doesn't offer prospective attendees any hope of learning something better. Who is it you're trying to reach, and what will they learn? It comes across as just a rant.

    • Jason Cusack
      By Jason Cusack  ~  3 months ago
      reply Reply

      Feedback taken George, thank you for that.  As i read through what I submitted months ago, and used your lens, I saw my submission in a much different light. 

      I absolutely do not want to come as ranting.  That said, I do want to use humor and irreverence to illustrate points and make connections with people.  I obviously failed if that was your take away. 

      I made some updates, and will make  a renewed effort to embrace the message I want to spread - which is the impact leaders can have on culture, specifically trust and courage. 

      Thank you for the kick in the shins.  My learning from this, is that I need to spend more time framing intent and outcomes. 

      Thanks for the opportunity to grow, and refine this topic.  Its an important one for our community.   


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