Agile Transformation without Change Management? … Like Diving in the Deep End without Knowing the Depth

While individual teams frequently experience new levels of productivity after adopting Agile, those same practices when applied more broadly rarely align with an organization’s existing norms, especially with regard to management style. It is often those techniques that got middle managers promoted that need to desist. For example, instead of pushing their team to over-deliver to the client an Agile product manager is better served by supporting the team in giving the customer just a fraction of potential value, sooner. Such adjustments are hard to address, but if they’re not, managers and team members become misaligned – some hold on to what worked previously, and others embrace new Agile approaches and expectations. This is borne out repeatedly in assessments that look at Agile and organizational culture.

Recently, Agilists representing 20+ Agile transformations at Fortune 500 companies were surveyed about the factors that most influence a successful transformation, positively or negatively. The two factors, among 24, that had the greatest influence – both as a roadblock and enabler – were Supportive IT leadership and Senior Executives Who Clearly Understand the Case for Change (to Agile).  

These results speak to the reality that scaling Agile requires more than organic growth or a “Coach them and it will happen” mentality. Transforming the organization, any significant transformation, requires highly engaged leadership who deeply care about the change, the goals and the path. Aligning the organization during Agile transformation can be done with an approach that is typical for organization change managers.

This talk will explain how to apply change management to your Agile Transformation so that ceremonies are better integrated, culture changes are more clearly defined and addressed, and management is positioned to lead the organization through the changes – all so that your organization delivers better results for its customers faster.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Intro

Why, as an Agilist, you should care about OCM?

The Agile Transformation – Making the Case for Change and What Happens if you Don't

Developing a Compelling Future State Vision of Life in an Agile Environment

Describing the Agile Transformation Journey 

What are the Symptoms of Agile Resistance and How Can they be Cured?

Q&A

Learning Outcome

This talk will explain how to apply change management to your Agile Transformation so that ceremonies are better integrated, culture changes are more clearly defined and addressed, and management is positioned to lead the organization through the changes.

Target Audience

Agile Coaches or those in organizations that are trying to implement Agile practices more effectively

Prerequisite

Just a basic understanding of Agile practices.

schedule Submitted 1 week ago

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