schedule Oct 16th 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM place Ballroom C people 9 Attending

Product owners face a challenge: potential new markets are vast and full of unknowns. Current thinking in successful product management recognizes the importance of learning about potential customers
and adapting product decisions to reflect those insights. However, many exercises and workshops
geared towards product owners treat target products and markets as a fixed, concrete objective—failing to include any market feedback

Dicey Markets is a product owner simulation designed to reflect many of the forces driving product owners, including unknown information about the market, competitive pressure, and technical debt. The simulation
emphasizes the role of rapid regular feedback in creating successful products in the face of uncertain markets.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The simulation is based on the following mechanics and metaphors:

* The market is represented in the simulation by an opaque bag filled with dice of varying properties. More than one team will be competing to build products that are described by the color, shape and numbers of potential dice in the market.
* Products are successful when the dice removed from the bag and rolled match the features of the product.
* There will be multiple teams building products for each bag/market, so success is measured not just by how well products match the dice, but how products perform compared to one another.

We will pause the simulation periodically to debrief and discuss the progress and lessons of the simulation.

Learning Outcome

One key learning outcome is the importance of validating your understanding of the market. We have come up with a number of elements for how we set up the game, and especially the population of dice in it, that should cause teams to pivot from their initial assumptions of the market. Another key is the importance of the speed of the feedback, so that the information gained can be acted upon sooner. An additional key is how to balance the various signals that product managers need to interpret in making decisions about their products.

Target Audience

People in product owner, other business roles, or other stakeholders who engage with these business roles

Prerequisite

It is helpful, but not necessary, if the participants have an understanding of Agile and/or Lean principles.

schedule Submitted 3 months ago

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