Performance Management in the Age of Agility

schedule Oct 15th 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM place Ballroom B people 17 Interested

Agility is about adaptation, challenging the status quo, experimentation and learning. HR has historically hewed closer to compliance, but that has been changing rapidly.

Today's nimble teams and workers will no longer tolerate stifling, staid environments and management practices. The newly popular label "people operations" implies an emphasis on human engagement over bureaucracy and regulation, and indeed many organizations have been moving this way.

Be inspired by some of the most daring advances in human resources while also learning some practical approaches and techniques that can be applied to start leading your business down this path. We'll discuss new approaches in hiring, performance management, learning and development, and even the structure of HR groups and roles. Participants will also enjoy a few exercises that will illustrate some interesting techniques.

Prepare yourself for HR in the next generation.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

How does HR change in the agile organization?

- Behavioral simulation

Where has it been applied?

- Case studies and group sharing

What new techniques and approaches can I use to start applying agile HR ideas in my organization?

- Technique-based exercises

Learning Outcome

Understand why and how HR is changing in agile organizations and learn how to start down this path yourself.

Target Audience

HR leaders and practitioners, organizational change agents and coaches

Prerequisite

This session does not assume any prior knowledge, but it will only cover agile concepts as they apply to the topic of HR.

schedule Submitted 5 months ago

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