Portfolio Management In An Agile World

schedule Oct 15th 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM place Room 6 people 29 Interested

When organizations move to agile for software delivery, there is often tension with traditional portfolio management. This talk will illustrate how an organization can move from traditional portfolio management approaches to one that embraces agile software delivery. Doing so enables organizations to become predictable, improve the flow of value delivered, and pivot more quickly if necessary.

We will demonstrate the use of governance that allows a more adaptive portfolio management approach. We will cover topics that enable agile portfolio management including:

  • Lean techniques for managing flow
  • Effective prioritization techniques
  • Long range road-mapping
  • Demand management and planning
  • Progressively elaborated business cases
  • Validation of outcomes
  • Support for audit and compliance needs

These topics will be illustrated by real-world examples of portfolio management that have been proven over the last five years with a wide range of clients.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • What does agile mean in this context
  • Lean techniques for managing flow
  • Effective prioritization techniques
  • Long range road-mapping
  • Demand management and planning
  • Progressively elaborated business cases
  • Validation of outcomes
  • Support for audit and compliance needs

Learning Outcome

  • An understanding of how portfolio management can work in an agile software delivery organization
  • What metrics are relevant in managing flow of value
  • How to create lightweight business cases
  • Prioritization using weighted shortest job
  • How to determine an organization's capacity
  • How to accommodate the needs of audit, compliance, and architectural oversight

Target Audience

Business and IT members that are moving to agile from a traditional portfolio management approach.

Prerequisite

None

schedule Submitted 3 months ago

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