Coach the Coach | The Coaching Backlog

You’re a new coach. Now what? This session will help you get started on an agile transformation assignment with a coaching backlog. This session will inform new coaches on “where to start” as an Agile Coach. The session will begin agile transformation challenges followed by common agile impediments, conditions for success, an agile readiness checklist and a coaching backlog including Epics, Features and Stories.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

4 min – Introduction: Agile Transformation Challenges

4 min – Common Agile Impediments

4 min - Conditions for Success, Agile Readiness Checklist

4 min – Short-term, long-term focus

21 min - The Backlog

  • Epics
  • Features
  • Stories

4 min - Agile Maturity Roadmap

4 min – Questions

Learning Outcome

  • An understanding of common agile impediments within an origination new to agile
  • Certain conditions of success that should be in place to embark on an agile journey within an organization
  • Ascertain if the organization ready to begin their transformation with an Agile Readiness Checklist
  • Attendees will walk away with a coaching backlog with Epics, Features and Stories

Target Audience

This is a beginner to level session for new coaches in an agile transformation role or anyone interested in building a coaching backlog.

Prerequisite

You’re a new coach. Now what? You know agile, have been on teams as a scrum master or product manager/owner or even a program manager, but now you are an agile coach and need help “jump in feet first.” This is a beginner to level session for new coaches in an agile transformation role.

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