DevOps needs to consider many different aspects of software quality, including security. The term DevSecOps was developed to highlight that security is a focus of the pipeline, not a second-class citizen.

Fortunately, we can define done for our pipeline so that it includes security. Continuous integration can invoke static analysis tools to test for security errors and check if we are using components with known vulnerabilities. Automated deployments and virtualization make dynamic environments available for testing in a production-like setting. Regression tests can drive traffic through proxies for security analysis. From the code to the systems where we deploy the software, the process can be designed to make sure that we follow security best practices, and not produce insecure software.

Participants will learn how to construct a definition of done that focuses on security in a DevOps pipeline. They will see how to define security practices that build confidence that they are doing DevSecOps, and how those practices and criteria might mature over time.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Talk

I’ll give an introduction to the definition of done and to DevOps vs. DevSecOps. Then I’ll talk about setting up a pipeline to support the definition of done, mention some security test tools that can be incorporated, and then talk about evaluating and reducing security risks via risk analysis.

Rough outline

  • Introduction (5 min)
  • Definition of Done (10 min)
  • DevOps vs. DevSecOps (10 min)
  • Pipeline Stages (10 min)
  • Examples of security testing (15 min)
  • Reducing Risk (10 min)
  • Wrap-up and Q&A (5 min)

Learning Outcome

  • Just like many other types of quality tests, security can and should be included in a team’s definition of done.
  • Continuous delivery practices offer a lot of opportunities to do security tests that you might not have done if you had to set aside an explicit phase of the development cycle to do them.
  • DevOps is about building confidence that the software is a viable candidate for production. Or realizing as early as you can that it isn’t. Security must be part of that.
  • Do just enough of each type of testing at each step in the delivery pipeline to determine if further testing is justified.
  • Security testing doesn’t have to be expensive or formal to add value. A little security testing at different stages of the software development process can build a lot of confidence.

Target Audience

Anyone working to build a continuous delivery pipeline with security as a focus.

Prerequisites for Attendees

Attendees should be at least roughly familiar with their current delivery process, or at least have a process in mind. No prior knowledge of security is assumed.

schedule Submitted 11 months ago

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