• Linda Cook
    Linda Cook
    Doug Depew
    Doug Depew
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Trying to figure out Agile Release Planning?  We've done it and we've done it well.  Twelve teams - done! Twenty teams - done! Forty teams - done!  If your organiztion needs to tackle the enterprise release planning beast, you should attend this session.  Whether you are struggling with planning a large agile release planning event or simply trying to figure out how to improve your current agile release planning events, this session will provide nuggets of learning from planning teams with hundreds of people spread around the globe.  Many organizations have tried to conduct enterprise agile release planning and gave up because they could not overcome some of the basic obstacles like who to invite, where to hold the event, and how to keep everyone engaged.  

    If you are trying to figure out how to coordinate two teams or dozens of teams, this session will provide insights into what works and what doesn't.  You will gain expereince by practicing actual agile release planning exercises to help you prepare for your orgainzations next agile RP event.  The learning expereince starts with a presentation on the key steps to consider as you launch a large agile program.

  • Liked Brian Barr
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Hop Onto the Release Orientation Trolley

    Brian Barr
    Brian Barr
    Naeem Hussain
    Naeem Hussain
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    This session will cover the WHAT, WHY, and HOW of release orientation:

    1. What does it mean to be a release-oriented organization? (WHAT)
    2. Why should you move to release orientation? (WHY)
    3. How do you make the shift to become a release-oriented organization? (HOW)

    WHAT (25 minutes): Project oriented organizations focus entirely on getting a related set of intent packaged into a container called a project and seeing that entire container move through from requirements generation to software release. Release-orientated organizations are singularly focused on continuously getting releases out the door that maximize business value delivery without being constrained to only releasing related business intent in the portfolio. To achieve the continuous release of software systems, organizations must apply lean thinking and principles to every aspect of their delivery frameworks and minimize the overhead associated with making releases with high quality. In this portion of the session, we will cover:

    • Agile organizational design and resource allocation to ensure maximum flow of shippable product to the release
    • Agile portfolio management, funding, and approval approach geared towards agile organizational design, smaller, incremental business intent approval and prioritization. Moving towards a mindset of customer value delivery in shorter iterations vs. delivering full projects. Moving away from large project funding towards capacity funding.
    • Lean configuration management and branching strategies focused on continuous releases
    • Automation strategies for a continuous integration, deployment, and testing model to allow scaling of a Release-Oriented organization
    • Fixed release schedules that provide a known cadence to delivery within groupings of business value streams
    • Lean, real-time architectural governance for new and significantly enhanced systems
    • The importance of holding and prioritizing retrospectives at both the team and release levels.
    • Creation of key Release-Oriented teams to provide the “glue” for the release and provide agile change management, software packaging and release

    WHY (10 minutes): Release-orientation gets the entire organization to focus on the most important reason we exist as software developers – maximizing business value delivery through frequent, quality software releases. Moving the organization towards release-orienting thinking provides an invaluable lens for wise organizational decision making. In this portion of the session, we will cover:

    • Examples of decisions made when release-oriented vs. project-oriented
    • Key benefits realized when you have moved towards release-orientation
    • Enablement for scaling of agile frameworks when release-oriented
    • Release-orientation budgeting reduces organizational churn for resource allocation

    HOW (15 minutes): The move from project-orientation to release-orientation is both a mindset shift as well as a framework practice change. For too many years, we as software developers, IT shops, and businesses have been successful delivering projects. In this portion of the session, we will cover:

    • How to sell the organization on the benefits of release-orientation
    • How to transform your company from its current organizational design to a structure that supports release-orientation - How to make release-orientation a long-lived, self-sustaining aspect of your software delivery framework.

    Q & A (10 minutes): The session will finish with a brief questions and answers section.

     

  • Liked Craeg K Strong
    keyboard_arrow_down

    How much testing is enough for software that can condemn a man to death? Traceability in an Agile Federal Government Agency Context

    Craeg K Strong
    Craeg K Strong
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Using tools like TDD and ATDD, Agile provides the means to be confident that your brand new software is well tested-- even for life critical situations such as criminal justice software.  But hold on a minute!  It is a rare mission critical system that is built completely from scratch.  There are always legacy components your team didn't build or doesn't control.  Maybe the previous contractor built it-- but now they are gone and it is your problem.  How can you be certain that everything functions properly in such a situation?  How much testing is enough?  How can you know whether a system has been tested?  These are the questions that standards such as CMMI and PMBOK seek to answer with traceability.

    The debate about traceability has been raging for a long time, with passionate advocates on both sides of the argument.   Projects following traditional waterfall methods, and projects that conform to PMBOK or CMMI standards often create and maintain a requirements traceability matrix, or RTM, a document that traces “shall” requirements to functional capabilities and testcases.  Some Agilists argue that the RTM is rarely consulted in practice, so the significant efforts required to maintain such a document are “waste.”  Others point out that agile practices such as TDD provide all the traceability that may be needed. This talk will explore the underlying reasons why traceability may be important and worthwhile in many Federal government contexts, and review exciting new technologies that may provide an “agile answer” to this conundrum.

  • Liked Harry Koehnemann
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Applying the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) to Lean Systems Engineering (LSE)

    Harry Koehnemann
    Harry Koehnemann
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Many large engineering programs and product development efforts are adopting Scrum and other agile practices at the team level, but struggle finding solutions that scale beyond the team. This presentation describes how to apply lean practices to complex systems development using the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe). 

    SAFe for Lean Systems Engineering (LSE) is an extension of the popular SAFe method with additions for engineering practices, customer/program management collaboration, and compliance.  SAFe LSE leverages the lean principles in SAFe and extends the framework to support program concepts including program milestones, release management, system specification and design, systems and other engineering disciplines, and systems I&V to name a few.  SAFe LSE targets large engineering programs and product development and provides an alternative method to the waterfall, phased-gate approach commonly seen in contracting situations.  Come learn how SAFe LSE can improve your program and engineering development.

  • Liked Dan Rawsthorne
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Scaling Scrum with Scrum

    Dan Rawsthorne
    Dan Rawsthorne
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Scrum is a very popular Agile Framework, but "out of the box" it is restricted to a single, co-located, Team working on a Single Product. Most situations are more complicated than that: multiple locations, multiple Products, multiple Teams, and so on. I will introduce a few patterns (Well-Formed Team, Program Team, Workgroup, ...) and show how they can be combined, using a few simple principles, to work in some quite complicated situations. I will also show how the two most popular scaling frameworks (SAFe and LeSS) can each be explained and improved by using these patterns.

  • Liked Amy Silberbauer
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Transforming How We Deliver Value: Agility at Scale

    Amy Silberbauer
    Amy Silberbauer
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Continuous delivery in software development allows us to deliver incrementally, get quick feedback, and react. A key enabler is the adoption of agile techniques and methods; key inhibitors in the enterprise are size, scale, and complexity. In particular, within large government organizations, teams face immense challenges in both the adoption of Agile and Lean principles but also scaling that adoption to an enterprise level. The Rational ALM organization is a typical enterprise, and our teams have (mostly) adopted agile principles. But agility at enterprise scale is not the same as team-based agile development. Now we must coordinate work across multiple interdependent teams to deliver value, rather than focusing on developing a single product or application. Amy Silberbauer shares her experience of adapting SAFe in an enterprise organization and describes the struggles, mistakes, and successes throughout that process. Amy identifies the key challenges, including the need to identify value, provide the right data for various audiences, and the inherent required culture shift. Learn how to avoid some common pitfalls as you and your own organization embark on this same transformation.

  • Liked Matt Badgley
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Yes, Words Really Do Mean Things - Establishing a Shared Language

    Matt Badgley
    Matt Badgley
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    During this conference, within the books we read, in our day-to-day lives -- we use words as a means to negotiate, interact, express, and do. Words, whether written or spoken can play differently based on the people that exchange them. In the world we are living today, words are bantered so freely that they cause a war or unite a community or save a marriage or demoralize a team.

    As we see today, the concepts of agile are permeating the enterprise and scaling out from the team to the program management office to the executing chambers. Words are often mis-used, mis-understood, and lead to bad behaviors.

    In this session, we'll discuss the general challenges of communications and the overwhelming vocalbulary that we have embedded in our craniums.  We'll explore words -- in particular, the words we use everyday around software development. We look at how some of the basic words we use like Velocity, Sprint, and Team have clear meanings and plenty of baggage. 

    To help solidify the learning of this workshop, we'll use a couple brainstorming games -- so come prepared to get engaged. We'll wrap-up by using our collective experiences to either find better ways to explain our words or establish brand new ones. Our ultimate goal is to establish a way an organization can establish an ubiquitous language around the work they do and ultimately improve communication which will lead to better agile transformations and hopefully better solutions.

  • Liked Itamar Goldminz
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Lean Scaling: From Lean Startup to Lean Enterprise

    Itamar Goldminz
    Itamar Goldminz
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Congratulations! You've found the right product-market fit, and it's now time to scale your business. But growing your organization often means slower decision making, increased complexity, and higher chance for misalignments. How can you grow your business while staying lean? Learn five key lessons on how to use smart tooling and process to address these complicated growth challenges.

  • Liked Kimberley Parsons
    keyboard_arrow_down

    The Trust Impediment: Cultivating Organizational Trust For Tremendous Results

    Kimberley Parsons
    Kimberley Parsons
    Carmen Sullo
    Carmen Sullo
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Often times, trust is the silent impediment that impacts teams’ ability to be most effective in their performance and delivery of results. The trust impediment is often hidden because teams are hanging posters with trust as a team norm or organizations have trust listed as a core value; but, the missing link is the establishment and maintenance of a culture of organizational trust between all levels of the players in the agile structure.

    Moving beyond the feeling or value of trust to the impact of it on behaviors and bottom-line at leadership and practitioner levels opens the door to resolving this barrier and increasing results. In this session we’ll explore the tangible expense of an organizational culture lacking trust and a solution for teams and leaders to move towards greater trust.

  • Liked Matt Phillips
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Cero a Cien: Creating Excellent Distributed Teams with Agile Principles & Values

    Matt Phillips
    Matt Phillips
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Building successful distributed delivery teams is a challenge. Leveraging the benefits of Agile methodologies is even harder. However, if you identify your vision of success, create a plan, and apply Agile principles and values, it is possible to create highly-performant, distributed Agile teams. 

    During this session, Matt, the Director of Project Management at Appia in Durham, and Jose Naranjo, a Team Lead with Velocity Partners in Colombia, share how they used Agile’s core principles and values as the foundation to build a successful nearshore team. Their experience report will show how to organize the teams, set up relevant working agreements and avoid the common “offshore/nearshore” pitfalls. 

    If you have participated in similar endeavors and did not see success, are currently working with distributed teams, or are about to embark on an initiative to build a new team, this presentation will provide a roadmap and useful strategy.

  • Liked Dave Chesebrough
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Considerations for Agile Adoption at the Team, Project, and Organizational Levels

    Dave Chesebrough
    Dave Chesebrough
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Panel
    Advanced

    Change is hard. For any organization, team, or individual, the ability to change is difficult even when the desire for the change exists. Some studies have revealed that even when people know they need to change, even at the risk of their lives, it is still difficult to adopt new practices and behaviors.  Knowing this, what are organizations and project teams doing to make agile adoption easier and how are they supporting the teams and the individual new to this way of developing software products and systems?

    Through a roundtable discussion with representatives from industry and government, we will share with you our experiences with Agile on Federal government projects and programs, the challenges we faced, lessons learned, and different activities we performed as we went through an agile transition. The intent is that our experiences will provide you with ideas that you can take back to your organization and teams to support your agile journey.

    The panelists will share their experiences in bringing agile to their own organizations as well to their government clients.  Topics to be addressed include:

    • What makes adoption easier?
    • Challenges faced and tactics to overcome them.
    • Lessons learned from a broad spectrum of successful, and unsuccessful, adoptions of agile methods in acquisition.

    Moderator:

    Dave Chesebrough, President, Association for Enterprise Information

    Panelists:

    Dr. Suzette Johnson, PMP, CSP, CSC, Certified (Agile) Scrum Coach, NGIS Technical Fellow and Chair of the Northrop Grumman Agile CoP.  Suzzette leads development of agile practices across programs serving government customers, including DoD and Federal Health IT. 

    Robin Yeman, Agile Transition Lead / SME, at Lockheed Martin where she defines Agile Strategy across capability areas at IS&GS; identifies and implements metrics to ensure results of strategy and enable course correction; develops Agile SMEs to support strategic consulting for program start-up, transition for waterfall, release planning, and execution; teaches and educates all levels at LM to allow LMCO to better meet customer needs; certifies large teams in the Scaled Agile Framework; and provides support in developing Performance Measurement Baseline and Agile EVM.

    Jerome (Jerry) Frese, Program Management Analyst at the Internal Revenue Service, is the organizer of an Inter-Agency Seminar whose purpose is to bring federal SDLC practitioners together so they can establish a network, learn about and share best practices and collaborate on new and innovative ways to support projects. Through the series of nine seminars he has worked with 33 other Government agencies fostering the implementation of agile in Federal IT. In his own agency, he brings 40 years of software development experience to his job the Senior Methodologist at the IRS.    

    James Barclay, Senior Systems Engineer, NGA Architecture & Engineering Group National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.

  • Liked Fadi Stephan
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Techniques for Keeping Distributed Retrospectives Effective and Fun

    Fadi Stephan
    Fadi Stephan
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    30 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Are you working in a distributed team and feel like your retrospectives are failing to deliver meaningful results? Are you spending less and less time on them? Are your retrospectives becoming boring dull and uninspiring? Retrospectives are a key mechanism for continuous improvement. This is especially true with non-collocated teams that deal with additional impediments and barriers due to communication difficulties. Come to this session to reverse this trend and learn new tools and techniques to conduct distributed team wide retrospectives that keep everyone engaged and result in effective discussion and follow-up action items and continuous improvement.

Sorry, no proposals found under this section.