• Liked Craeg K Strong
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    How much testing is enough for software that can condemn a man to death? Traceability in an Agile Federal Government Agency Context

    Craeg K Strong
    Craeg K Strong
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Using tools like TDD and ATDD, Agile provides the means to be confident that your brand new software is well tested-- even for life critical situations such as criminal justice software.  But hold on a minute!  It is a rare mission critical system that is built completely from scratch.  There are always legacy components your team didn't build or doesn't control.  Maybe the previous contractor built it-- but now they are gone and it is your problem.  How can you be certain that everything functions properly in such a situation?  How much testing is enough?  How can you know whether a system has been tested?  These are the questions that standards such as CMMI and PMBOK seek to answer with traceability.

    The debate about traceability has been raging for a long time, with passionate advocates on both sides of the argument.   Projects following traditional waterfall methods, and projects that conform to PMBOK or CMMI standards often create and maintain a requirements traceability matrix, or RTM, a document that traces “shall” requirements to functional capabilities and testcases.  Some Agilists argue that the RTM is rarely consulted in practice, so the significant efforts required to maintain such a document are “waste.”  Others point out that agile practices such as TDD provide all the traceability that may be needed. This talk will explore the underlying reasons why traceability may be important and worthwhile in many Federal government contexts, and review exciting new technologies that may provide an “agile answer” to this conundrum.

  • Liked Roland Cuellar
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    IV&V for Federal Agile Programs: A Customer Experience Report

    Roland Cuellar
    Roland Cuellar
    Ken
    Ken
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate
    1. Many federal government organizations have a requirement to perform independent verification and validation (IV&V) of software development projects for purposes of risk identification and compliance
    2. As more federal agencies move towards agile, they will need to devise agile-appropriate methods for evaulating agile teams and contractors for process performance and project risk identification
    3. Traditional approaches to IV&V are heavily biased towards waterfall, gate reviews, and traditional SDLC artifacts and hence, do not work well within an agile envrionment
    4. Agile programs have their own process-specific risks and issues that need to be evaluated uniquely.  The document-centric approach that has traditionally been used is innapropriate and ineffective for agile teams as it does not find the right risks and does not find them early enough in the development process.
    5. We at DHS/CIS have developed a unique, agile-appropriate IV&V model for a large agile transformation effort within DHS
    6. The model is used to discover process risks, design risks, code risks, and testing risks in real-time for agile teams
    7. The model serves as actionable and real-time feedback to teams, contractors, and federal managers that can be used for process improvement, vendor evaluation, and as a means to find and elevate delivery risks on agile projects
    8. Positive results, challenges, and recommendations related to the development, roll-out, and execution of this agile-appropriate IV&V model will  be shared
  • Liked Dave Chesebrough
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    Considerations for Agile Adoption at the Team, Project, and Organizational Levels

    Dave Chesebrough
    Dave Chesebrough
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Panel
    Advanced

    Change is hard. For any organization, team, or individual, the ability to change is difficult even when the desire for the change exists. Some studies have revealed that even when people know they need to change, even at the risk of their lives, it is still difficult to adopt new practices and behaviors.  Knowing this, what are organizations and project teams doing to make agile adoption easier and how are they supporting the teams and the individual new to this way of developing software products and systems?

    Through a roundtable discussion with representatives from industry and government, we will share with you our experiences with Agile on Federal government projects and programs, the challenges we faced, lessons learned, and different activities we performed as we went through an agile transition. The intent is that our experiences will provide you with ideas that you can take back to your organization and teams to support your agile journey.

    The panelists will share their experiences in bringing agile to their own organizations as well to their government clients.  Topics to be addressed include:

    • What makes adoption easier?
    • Challenges faced and tactics to overcome them.
    • Lessons learned from a broad spectrum of successful, and unsuccessful, adoptions of agile methods in acquisition.

    Moderator:

    Dave Chesebrough, President, Association for Enterprise Information

    Panelists:

    Dr. Suzette Johnson, PMP, CSP, CSC, Certified (Agile) Scrum Coach, NGIS Technical Fellow and Chair of the Northrop Grumman Agile CoP.  Suzzette leads development of agile practices across programs serving government customers, including DoD and Federal Health IT. 

    Robin Yeman, Agile Transition Lead / SME, at Lockheed Martin where she defines Agile Strategy across capability areas at IS&GS; identifies and implements metrics to ensure results of strategy and enable course correction; develops Agile SMEs to support strategic consulting for program start-up, transition for waterfall, release planning, and execution; teaches and educates all levels at LM to allow LMCO to better meet customer needs; certifies large teams in the Scaled Agile Framework; and provides support in developing Performance Measurement Baseline and Agile EVM.

    Jerome (Jerry) Frese, Program Management Analyst at the Internal Revenue Service, is the organizer of an Inter-Agency Seminar whose purpose is to bring federal SDLC practitioners together so they can establish a network, learn about and share best practices and collaborate on new and innovative ways to support projects. Through the series of nine seminars he has worked with 33 other Government agencies fostering the implementation of agile in Federal IT. In his own agency, he brings 40 years of software development experience to his job the Senior Methodologist at the IRS.    

    James Barclay, Senior Systems Engineer, NGA Architecture & Engineering Group National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.

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