Lean Scaling: From Lean Startup to Lean Enterprise

Congratulations! You've found the right product-market fit, and it's now time to scale your business. But growing your organization often means slower decision making, increased complexity, and higher chance for misalignments. How can you grow your business while staying lean? Learn five key lessons on how to use smart tooling and process to address these complicated growth challenges.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Introduction

Lesson #1: Scaling decision making Sr. Mgmt does not have enough context to make the right decisions at more tactical levels:

  • Form cross-functional core teams to drive effective decision making down the org.
  • Use the wiki as a tool to keep teams small enough to enable effective decision making while giving everyone else visibility into their work

 

Lesson #2 Scaling knowledge management Trust in your wiki's content needs to be established proactively.

  • Differentiate between "ungroomed" and "groomed" parts and adopt a wikipedia-like "editor model" for the latter

 

Lesson #3: Scaling project management Scope is no longer the biggest risk threatening successful delivery.

  • Dependency management and other risks that have to do with the social/collaborative aspect of software development are growing in importance ->
  • Make dependencies a "first class citizen" in JIRA - not just an issue link, but a real issue type with its own workflow and information radiators

 

Lesson #4: Scaling planning: There are substantially more projects simultaneously in flight to effectively manage your R&D portfolio with a simple 2-level Feature-Task/Story/Bug hierarchy ->

  • Expand the backlog model to 3 levels.
  • Structure a workflow that track larger scale projects throughout the value stream (not just through the build portion).

 

Lesson #5: Scaling collaboration: With 2-3 teams - you can just get your 4-6 PMs and Eng Mgrs in a room and discuss. This doesn't work when you have 50 of them.

  • -> Build effective information radiators mashing up content from wiki, JIRA and SFDC (through smart use of plugins and templates).
  • Apply Jeff Weiner's "one rule to eliminate useless meetings". Run your roadmapping sessions more like a "science fair".

Learning Outcome

All of the lessons below are stated in a generalized way so they are applicable to a wide audience. But to make them more tangible, I will support each of them with details on the particular ways in which we chose to implement them in our tooling instance (Atlassian product suite)

Lesson #1: Scaling decision making Sr. Mgmt does not have enough context to make the right decisions at more tactical levels: Form cross-functional core teams to drive effective decision making down the org. Use the wiki as a tool to keep teams small enough to enable effective decision making while giving everyone else visibility into their work

Lesson #2 Scaling knowledge management Trust in your wiki's content needs to be established proactively. Differentiate between "ungroomed" and "groomed" parts and adopt a wikipedia-like "editor model" for the latter

Lesson #3: Scaling project management Scope is no longer the biggest risk threatening successful delivery. Dependency management and other risks that have to do with the social/collaborative aspect of software development are growing in importance -> Make dependencies a "first class citizen" in JIRA - not just an issue link, but a real issue type with its own workflow and information radiators

Lesson #4: Scaling planning: There are substantially more projects simultaneously in flight to effectively manage your R&D portfolio with a simple 2-level Feature-Task/Story/Bug hierarchy -> Expand the backlog model to 3 levels. Structure a workflow that track larger scale projects throughout the value stream (not just through the build portion).

Lesson #5: Scaling collaboration With 2-3 teams - you can just get your 4-6 PMs and Eng Mgrs in a room and discuss. This doesn't work when you have 50 of them. -> Build effective information radiators mashing up content from wiki, JIRA and SFDC (through smart use of plugins and templates). Apply Jeff Weiner's "one rule to eliminate useless meetings". Run your roadmapping sessions more like a "science fair".

The Bleeding Edge (things we're looking into today): * Applying some cost-of-delay analysis to projects prioritization process * Expanding dependency management to a more comprehensive risk management scheme * Expanding the lean approach beyond R&D and into our strategic planning process (strategy, revenue, budgets/staffing)

Target Audience

Anyone implementing or considering implementing agile at scale

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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  • George Dinwiddie
    By George Dinwiddie  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Good afternoon Itamar,

    We have not yet received a response from you with respect to the invitation to present at AgileDC next month.  Please RSVP to the invitation sent on August 29th, or, alternately, via email that “I AM IN” to SPEAKERS@AGILEDC.ORG , by 11:59PM Sunday, September  7th, 2014 .  If we do not hear from you, we will have to forfeit your spot.

    Have a great weekend!  

    Best,

     

    George Dinwiddie and Phillip Manketo

     

    for the AgileDC organizing committee


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