Faster than a speeding bullet – less risk than a water fall!

Faster than a speeding bullet – less risky than a waterfall!

Government programs and agencies follow structured guidelines for just about everything. Guidelines reduce risk and control the value of products and services provided. It should come as no surprise that government organizations generally follow very structured processes for systems and software delivery too. However, the reality in today’s world is that change is inevitable and structured processes don’t harmonize well with change. Programs find themselves driven towards a more continuous engineering approach, where requirements evolve, stakeholders are engaged and an on-demand understanding of engineering artifacts optimizes decision making. These practices are key to Agile development which several government organizations have embraced in order to cope with rapid change and ever-rising citizen expectations.

In this talk we will present real government case studies of agile adoption for systems and software engineering. We will discuss the objectives, adoption, application and outcomes for each case study and then open the discussion for Q&A.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Introduction to Challenges facing government systems and software engineering

Outline of options to address challenges

Case studies

Q&A

Learning Outcome

The partiicpant will understand the challenges ogvernment programs face today that can addressed by Agile practices, examples of how other  government organizations adopted agile practices to support accelerating delivery of high quality

Target Audience

Government, engineering leaders, IT managers, Technical leaders

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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