As experienced Agilists, we’ve all come to understand complex concepts such as time boxes, just-in-time planning and retrospectives. And, even if we haven’t, we’ve successfully gotten away with pretending that we understand exactly what each of these things mean! But, what happens when you have to explain one of these concepts to someone that is new to Agile? Can we simply provide these eager people with a textbook definition and assume that they get it?
 
Similarly, a mindset shift to the values and principles of the Agile Manifesto can be difficult for anyone to comprehend. When we talk about individuals and interactions over processes and tools, among many other catchy phrases, what does that really mean? How do we explain this to experienced Agilists, not to mention people that are just embarking on their Agile journey?
 
Games can expedite the understanding of these concepts and mindset shifts. They help create individual “aha” moments that can really move a person to embrace Agile. In this presentation we will identify some of these complex concepts and talk about various games that can be used to help convey these difficult to understand concepts.  In the end, you can add these games to your toolkit and use them to help teach your teams and others in your organization.
 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Outline:

  • Set the stage
  • Common complex concepts
  • Overview of games
  • Walk through each complex concept and the appropriate game to use
  • Wrap up

Learning Outcome

Attendees will gain knowledge of valuable games to add to their toolkit and when to use them to help teach their teams and others in their organization. 

Target Audience

Project Managers, ScrumMasters, Stakeholders, Customers, Testers, Developers, Product Owners, Program Managers

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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