How to Agile When You Can't Scrum - Delivering Value for the Federal Government

One of the most interesting aspect of working with Federal Government clients can also be one of the most challenging - no two agencies (or even groups within agencies) do things the same way.  In today's landscape, nearly everyone has heard of "Agile" but the level of understanding, adoption, and sophistication is wildly varied.  As eager and indoctrinated Agile practioners, we must learn to strike a functional balance between mandating traditional Agile dogma and the realities of Federal environments.  In this discussion, I will share five Agile principles whose applications can be tailored to drive the delivery of value even when governance seemingly does not support Agile methods.  I will also share lessons learned from implementing and using Scrum-based agile processes in various Federal enviornments to deliver value.  This session is meant to be interactive and I will actively take questions from the audience at the end.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Introduction (5 minutes) - Who is Jeremy Kolonay and what's his background to speak on this topic?
  2. Five Agile Things (45 minutes) - Five mandatory principles of Agile that must (and can!) be applied in the federal space to deliver value
  3. Open to Questions (10 Minutes)

Learning Outcome

After this discussion, you will have some tools to help work through impediments to success when engaging customers, Federal or otherwise.

Target Audience

Idealistic Agile Practioners, Frustrated Federal Program Managers, and anyone else who wants to deliver value in the face of governance!

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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  • Christopher Bourdeau
    By Christopher Bourdeau  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    Wow.  This is both on point and timely.  Very much looking forward to this proposal


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