From an agile implementation perspective, emphasizing the art of facilitation is an incredibly powerful tool for creating a culture of collaboration, and then leveraging that culture as a springboard to organizational transformation.  With strong facilitators at the gateway between business and IT, within IT delivery teams, and at key intersection points within an organization, the challenges to achieving organizational agility diminish. Strong facilitators bring forth the wisdom of teams and provide a container for self-organization. Facilitation is the cornerstone of servant leadership. 

 
5 favorite thumb_down thumb_up 1 comment visibility_off  Remove from Watchlist visibility  Add to Watchlist
 

Outline/structure of the Session

The workshop will be a facilitated session, modeling a variety of group facilitation techniques. It will start using a technique called “simultaneous surveys” to get an idea of the group’s baseline definitions of facilitation, empowerment, and organizational agility. After 5 minutes of processing the outputs, participants will then engage in a modified “World Café” style exercise and use brainwriting to provide input on topics related to facilitating individual and team empowerment. This activity session close with a large group wrap-up, identifying key takeaways and open questions. 

The remaining time will be used to present key facilitation concepts and illustrate the synergy betwee facilitation and empowered agile teams / organizations.

Learning Outcome

-       Facilitation is more than just running a meeting. It is about designing powerful activities to harvest the wisdom of the group and forward a group’s agenda to achieve desired outcomes.

-       Because the talk itself is a facilitated session, participants will see facilitation applied and will learn tools they can use immediately.

-       At their essence, facilitation, empowerment, and agility have a lot in common. Participants will leave understanding the power of facilitation and its importance to sustaining agility. 

Target Audience

This session will benefit from a diversity of agile backgrounds, experience levels and interests. Anyone with a passion for team empowerment and an interest in facilitation will gain useful tools from this session.

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

Comments Subscribe to Comments

comment Comment on this Proposal
  • John Hughes
    By John Hughes  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Shannon is a brilliant agilist.  I am very interested in attending her session as I have seen her in action and know it will be fantastic.


  • Liked Shawn Faunce
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Shawn Faunce - Engaging a Product Owner on a Government Contract: Challenges and Solutions

    30 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Great systems require active, capable Product Owners.  Functional innovation is not possible without their commitment and involvement in the project.  Too often in government contracting, the Product Owner is an Absentee Owner.  Agile Development teams often seek out tools and techniques to create great systems, however too frequently what is holding them back is the lack of an engaged Product Owner. Teams in this situation must face the elephant in the room if they desire to build a system that brings positive change in efficiency, productivity, quality, usefulness, and adoption.  This talk shares solutions I have used for challenges I see again and again on government contracts.

    The talk begins with some introductory material on the problem, its causes, what I mean by functional innovation, and why this is required to build great systems.  I describe four challenges with Product Owner engagement that are not unique to government contracting, but that I see recurring on projects: committing staff, procurement practices, role ambiguity, and absentee ownership.

  • Liked John Hughes
    keyboard_arrow_down

    John Hughes - Testing Inside Your Timebox: Death to the Hardening Sprint

    John Hughes
    John Hughes
    Director and Agile Coach
    Sevatec
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Testing sprints? Hardening sprints? Why do so many of us have these and other ways to get around completing all our required testing inside our defined timeboxes? Isn’t our goal to produce deployable features at the end of every Sprint?

    During our session, we will examine why it’s so hard to accomplish all necessary testing inside the iteration and show how to complete these tests within your timebox. Through interactive discussion and real world examples, we will provide insights on foreseeing, overcoming, and avoiding your hurdles and send you home with both long term methods and short term actions that will yield tangible results in achieving your goal.

    Our session will:
    • Illustrate the value of completing all of your testing inside your timebox
    • Identify the challenges in completing all these tests in such as seemingly short period of time
    • Discuss ideas and options to successfully overcome these challenges
    • Explore how to enable your organization and environment for efficient, rapid testing
    • Discuss real world examples of enablement and how we navigated the pain points of enabling testing processes that allow complete testing within an iteration
    • Explore DevOpsSec and how achieving testing within your timebox is a precursor to DevOpsSec
    • Provide short term tactics and actions to immediately improve your ability to complete your testing
    • Allow you to voice your concerns and challenges and discuss potential solutions to these impediments

    Most of us implement agile to reduce the time to deliver valuable working software and to increase the frequency of delivery with high quality through increased and earlier collaboration, shorter feedback loops, and reduced risk. While you can show improvement over Waterfall by performing typical agile methods, you cannot really live the dream without optimizing your agile execution.

    You will leave this session armed with the right knowledge to improve delivery on your current project or start your new projects properly so that you or your clients can reap the benefits of efficient process and high-quality software capable of achieving continuous deployment of fully-tested code at the end of each iteration.

  • Liked Dan Neumann
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Dan Neumann - Principle-Centered Agility: Your Path to Better Options

    Dan Neumann
    Dan Neumann
    Agile Coach
    AgileThought
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Do you want to have a high functioning Agile team? If so, this session is for you! We're going beyond the rules of agile frameworks and learning to apply those principles to improve our teams and companies! The 12 principles of the Agile Manifesto capture the reasons we are able to deliver better software. This is the "why" for some of the rules behind Scrum and Kanban. The principles ought guide our decisions about practices, scaling, and solving tricky problems!

    In this session, we will use the 12 Principles of the Agile Manifesto as our foundation. Then, we will  apply techniques such as Force Field Analysis to apply the principles to your challenges at work. Lastly, we will use principles of change management to make the change more likely to stick.

    The outline for the session is:

    1. Explore the principles; which ones are present or absent in your environment?
    2. Introduce Force Field Analysis
    3. Use Force Field Analysis to explore what drives a specific behavior
    4. Use the Agile Principles to generate new options for tackling your team's challenges
    5. Explore effective change management techniques

    With these five activities, you will leave with a framework for change to apply when you return to work and continue on your agile journey.

  • Liked Philip Rogers
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Philip Rogers - Lean Coffee: Creative Uses of this Technique to Rapidly Surface Ideas and Encourage Team Collaboration

    Philip Rogers
    Philip Rogers
    Scrum Master
    NPR
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    30 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Lean Coffee is frequently used in meetup and conference settings. The beauty of Lean Coffee is its simplicity, and it is this very simplicity which makes it an appealing choice in various Agile team contexts. Specifically, Lean Coffee is particularly good for ad hoc training sessions and for retrospectives. The focus of this workshop will be on the use of Lean Coffee in these two types of settings, where we will split up into small groups and practice using Lean Coffee to cover ad hoc training topics and to do a mini-retrospective.

     

  • George Paci
    George Paci
    Agile Coach
    Santeon
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    30 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Agile planning tools started simple: index cards, markers, and a table or wall. On many projects, for many reasons, these old stalwarts have been supplemented (or even replaced) by software solutions: Rally, VersionOne, Jira Agile, Trello, Trac, Scrumy, and literally dozens more, even BaseCamp. These tools have undeniable advantages over cardboard and ink in some aspects, but they're not superior in every situation.

    This session will highlight the pitfalls of centering planning meetings around software tools—even the best ones, like [your ad here]—and make a badly-needed sales pitch for index cards on a wall (compensating for Oxford's oddly anemic marketing effort). You'll see how cards can make better use of your team's time and brainpower, promote parallelism in meetings, and increase engagement by all participants.

  • Liked Joshua Seckel
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Joshua Seckel - No defects in a government setting? What does that really mean?

    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    We have heard a lot about no defects or zero defects, but is that reasonable or achievable in the government context?  How else can each sprint be deployable? Or how can you get to true flow with each story deployed to production?

     This session will explore how to get to a no defects posture across all of the tests required in a government setting. 

    We will look at the various types of testing:

    Unit, Functional, Integration, Security, 508, System, User Acceptance, etc 

    We will look at what defects mean and how (or if) they should be tracked

    We will look at what potential impediments from government organziations may exist in reaching a no defect state of software delivery

    We will look at what tools and techniques can be used successfully in the government setting to address the impediments and achieve no defects in released software

  • Liked Roland Cuellar
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Roland Cuellar - IV&V for Federal Agile Programs: A Customer Experience Report

    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate
    1. Many federal government organizations have a requirement to perform independent verification and validation (IV&V) of software development projects for purposes of risk identification and compliance
    2. As more federal agencies move towards agile, they will need to devise agile-appropriate methods for evaulating agile teams and contractors for process performance and project risk identification
    3. Traditional approaches to IV&V are heavily biased towards waterfall, gate reviews, and traditional SDLC artifacts and hence, do not work well within an agile envrionment
    4. Agile programs have their own process-specific risks and issues that need to be evaluated uniquely.  The document-centric approach that has traditionally been used is innapropriate and ineffective for agile teams as it does not find the right risks and does not find them early enough in the development process.
    5. We at DHS/CIS have developed a unique, agile-appropriate IV&V model for a large agile transformation effort within DHS
    6. The model is used to discover process risks, design risks, code risks, and testing risks in real-time for agile teams
    7. The model serves as actionable and real-time feedback to teams, contractors, and federal managers that can be used for process improvement, vendor evaluation, and as a means to find and elevate delivery risks on agile projects
    8. Positive results, challenges, and recommendations related to the development, roll-out, and execution of this agile-appropriate IV&V model will  be shared
  • Liked Alexei Zheglov
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Alexei Zheglov - Five Very Important Numbers And How They Can Help Improve Your Knowledge-Work Organization

    60 mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    This session will be about five numerical characteristics of a process.  (Call them "metrics", but beware we will be discussing only those that are difficult to game.)  I chose five of them that are not often discussed,  rarely measured, and even less frequently used in making decisions.

    This happens partly because of inertia.  In the better-studied world of manufacturing physical products and services, for example, one of these quantities approaches 100%, another one is almost always (ideally) zero, and yet another one is a single number rather than a statistical distribution.  You don't even have to think about them.  But when the customer value is created in the brains of intellectual workers rather than on the assembly line, the five quantities we will be discussing reveal non-trivial insights.

    We will discuss what you can do to measure them when you return to your office on Wednesday.  We will also discuss how you can practially use the new knowledge, starting on Thursday, to find new leverage for improvement, find time for work that is important, but not urgent, balance capabilities of your organization with the demand placed upon it, deal with uncertainty, and forecast the delivery of your projects and other commitments.

     

  • Liked Richard Cheng
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Richard Cheng - A Roadmap for (Agile) Engineering Best Practices – What Every Non-Technical Person Needs to Know

    Richard Cheng
    Richard Cheng
    Principal
    Excella Consulting
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Summary: Presenting a roadmap explaining engineering best practices, why it’s needed, supporting tools, level of effort to implement, and sequence for implementing.

    21st Century IT development requires building quality into our development practices yet many software teams fail to implement technical practices that are necessary for long term success. Practices like automated builds, automated tests, automated deployments, continuous integration, and continuous delivery are now considered essential for the success of any software development project. Without these practices, the quality of software goes downhill and teams can no longer sustain their initial high levels of productivity.

     

    However, understanding and implementing the practices can seem daunting.  This session presents an easy to understand roadmap for implementing engineering best practices.  The roadmap explains what the practices are, the tools that support the practices, a recommended sequence to implement, and effort to implement.

     

    Though this topic is about engineering best practices, attendees do not have to be technical to get value from this session.  The session gives a non-technical look at a technical concept and is great for any person in the organization managing, working with, or working on IT teams/programs.

     

     

  • Liked bchaplin1
    keyboard_arrow_down

    bchaplin1 - Minimizing Technical Debt Via Agile Metrics and Techniques

    bchaplin1
    bchaplin1
    Metrics Architect
    Chaplin Solutions
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Automate and mine those code quality statistics from Sonar and use Agile techniques to transform your team and codebase!

    Studies show that poor code quality can cut your velocity in half as early as the second release.  But there's hope.  Yes, you can make your deadlines and still have little or no technical debt.  

    Using proper metrics 50% of the 100 committing developers had no tech debt and 100% test coverage for all their code submitted in 2013.  

    Use key code quality metrics to manage your team's quality and ensure your second release is just as productive as the first.    

  • Liked shentonfreude
    keyboard_arrow_down

    shentonfreude - Making a Better Salad: Behavior-Driven Development with Lettuce

    30 mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    Is your organization still using brittle GUI driven-tools to ensure applications can be tested? Do you find these difficult to map to the user stories that describe product owner/business needs? One of the current Agile practices to doing this is Behavior-Driven Development (aka Acceptance Test-Driven Development) and writing user stories and acceptance criteria in a Specifications by Example format.  This has real power in that business people can understand the tests and the delivery team can ensure the code meets the tests, thus they serve as an example.

     

    This tutorial will give a short background on Specs by Example/BDD and the show you how to write such tests in Lettuce.  You will gain a deeper understanding of how you can apply this to writing your applications.

     

  • Liked Daniel Gullo
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Daniel Gullo - WANTED: Agile Coach, Scrum Master, CEO, whatever... (How to make your Agile transformation successful.)

    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    The term “coach” has become an overloaded and almost meaningless term in much the same way that “agile” has.  Many individuals are calling themselves coaches who have little or no practical experience with Agile in large enterprise organizations.  Organizations are similarly confused about who they really need to bring success to their Agile transformation, and thus, are advertising for the wrong skills.

  • 60 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Many agile initiatives suffer from a feeble launch.  As Aristotle once stated “Well begun is half done”.  Performing the activities associated with developing a sound charter can help increase the likelihood of success for a team or organization .  

    Beginning with the end in mind, we use retrospective techniques to develop consensus around objectives, vision, and mission.  In this workshop we introduce the components of a good charter and how those components help focus the teammates toward a common goal.  In addition, the development of the recommended charter components ensures that key questions are succinctly answered during the kickoff of a team.

    Participants will learn the various types of charters and their recommended content.  During the workshop activity teams will develop a complete charter based  team of their choice or a provided case study.

  • Liked John Hughes
    keyboard_arrow_down

    John Hughes - Waterfall comfort in an agile world: How to give Execs the answers they "used to get" now that you are agile

    John Hughes
    John Hughes
    Director and Agile Coach
    Sevatec
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Your progressive and efficient agile program can go downhill fast, and agile can get a bad rap, if upper management begins to think that the answers they used to get in the "Waterfall world" are no longer available to them in an agile world. Executives assume the team is managed poorly if they can’t produce artifacts they are used to seeing like fully resourced project schedules. They get frustrated when they can’t get a “straight answer” to questions they are used to having answered like “what is the project schedule’s critical path showing,” or “are we staffed properly to complete all the remaining requirements by the end of the contract.” They become unhappy with the team and possibly even start to see that “agile doesn’t work for our program” if they are told that they can’t get that information anymore in agile, or it isn’t clearly explained to them how to ask for the information they are really trying to understand.

    The answers are still there though the tools and methods are likely different. We need to be able to translate the questions being asked and help upper management understand how to better ask the questions to get what they are really looking for. Executives are responsible for ensuring the health of the program, that sufficient progress is being made, the program is within budget, the contractual requirements are being met, etc. Agile methods can leave executives uneasy because answers to questions regarding these can be “squishy” since user stories can be added and removed, they can use relative sizing techniques for estimation instead of specific hours, priorities can shift, and the customer’s needs drive much of the process decisions. By understanding what upper management really needs in order to be successful themselves, and how to extract that information using our agile toolset, we will be able to give them the data they need to continue managing the program and communicating its health to their leadership and customer counterparts. The goal for this session is to provide you insight into what is really being asked, to help your leadership better ask the questions “in an agile way,” and to deliver impactful answers derived from our agile toolset that allows for strong communication of the health of your program.

  • Paul Boos
    Paul Boos
    IT Executive Coach
    Excella
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    3 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Creating an approach for change is difficult. There is a fine line between imposing an Agile adoption and creating a Transformation where people are collaboratively working together for the change. Based on my experience and in large US Federal Government organizations where imposed adoptions seem the norm, I’ve been working on combining many concepts into a transformation model that can work for large organizations that have ingrained cultures. This starts by helping the organization’s people take ownership and personalize what Agile means to them. Believe it or not, this can work.

    Intended for senior executives and their immediate staff (and the coaches that help them), the Taking Flight approach presents the importance of culture and how creating an organizational aspiration will help guide people. For large organizations, culture has been built up over decades and changing this is of the utmost importance to have an Agile Adoption stick. There are 3 main points I’ll address:
    - how to get people ‘onboard’ with a cohesive direction that they accept by collaboratively building their aspiration
    - how to develop and select strategies for incremental improvement towards the aspiration
    - how to realize changing from old routines into new ones aligned with the aspiration

    To help establish cohesive direction, I use an Aspirational model (your Guiding Star) to help organizations develop the direction they want to go. I show how the differences between an Aspirational model and an End-State. I explain that aspirations are inspiring and allow for a mindset change by not expressing the final state in terms of structure our expected metrics. From there, I discuss different techniques for assessing the current state of the organization and its people and developing strategies and actions for the necessary change management to move towards the organizational Aspiration; this is where the concrete steps come into play. Throughout this portion, I have the group try out various techniques for building an aspirational model and how to build the backlog of work to undertake the transformation. I introduce the Power of Habit as a means to help the organization undergo the necessary behavior changes. I close with a discussion to help the audience think around limiting change-in-progress and how to grow capacity to become more responsive to change.

    In this, you’ll get exposed to a few of many hands-on techniques that can be used to develop your Aspiration and execute on it. These are:

    • KrisMap
    • Business Model Canvas
    • Habit Loops
  • Liked John Hughes
    keyboard_arrow_down

    John Hughes - The value is in Being Agile, not Doing Agile

    John Hughes
    John Hughes
    Director and Agile Coach
    Sevatec
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    “Being agile” is a mindset change.  You can’t “be agile” just by following agile processes.  Agile practices have intended benefit which you likely will not achieve if you just “do agile.”  Assessing the processes and practices to understand why they have been put in place, and what they are trying to achieve, will help you start to see how you can produce the intended value agile is meant to bring.  When you and your team can see the intended value of the practices then you can perform better as a team, deliver more accurately and more frequently, and please your customer and users much more consistently.

    We will explore agile practices such as the Scrum ceremonies, WIP limits, specific information radiators, etc. to assess what they are really trying to achieve.  Agile processes derive in part from psychological attributes and needs.  Humans execute agile delivery and to come together better as a team, keep our customers and upper management comfortably informed, produce what our customers and users really want, and consistently deliver high quality software, we need to fulfill our psychological needs and address our human factors.  This session will help you to understand what the intended goals are in these practices, what mindset changes may be necessary, and how you can ensure that your team achieves the value.  If your team is just “doing agile” then your project will likely wind up as another one that “was not well-suited for agile” in the eyes of your team, upper management or customer.  If your team can ”be agile,” then upper management will celebrate your success and your customers will applaud the efficiency by which your happy team routinely delivers the precise features they are looking for.

  • Liked David W Kane
    keyboard_arrow_down

    David W Kane - The Role of Architecture in Agile Development

    60 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    In large Government and Commercial organizations with many interacting systems, architecture is necessary to collaborate effectively across disparate entities and systems. Traditional command and control approaches to architecture are often ineffective and cause great tension, especially when Agile efforts are part of the portfolio. We will discuss two principles, Vision and Partnering.  These principles provide insight and get results for both architects and Agilists; and present tools and approaches on how to effectively engage architects and architecture.

  • Liked Brandon Raines
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Brandon Raines - No Way! Agile in the Federal Government

    60 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    There are so many challenges that organizations face. Healthy organizations continuously tool and re-tool themselves to go from good to great. This session will describe the road taken to transform a major government organization using Agile, Lean and Scrum principles, practices and techniques. From the contracting process to initiating, executing and closing projects, to redesigning the physical workspaces, and moving from a matrix to a team centric structure, this organization completely re-tooled how it did business, for the better.

  • Liked Kerri Sutey
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Kerri Sutey - Implementing Scrum Successfully on a Non-Software Development Project

    30 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    A common misconception of Agile Scrum is that it can only be applied to software development projects.  This case study examines a DOD Modeling & Simulation project set in a Scrum environment and focuses on the roles, interactions and "rules of engagement" for all relevant stakeholders. Some of the key aspects that will be described are the critical importance of the team, customer involvement, frequent communication, and lessons learned. Executed properly, Scrum can transform the responsiveness, productivity, and quality of products and organizations. This work serves as proof that Agile can be successfully implemented in non-software development projects.

  • Liked Mark Grove
    keyboard_arrow_down

    Mark Grove - Four Easy To Adopt Agile Metrics for Teams Just Getting Started

    60 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Using metrics to track agile team performance can be an important tool to reinforce the need for continuous improvement. Metrics can serve as valuable input during retrospectives, the daily standup, and sprint planning allowing teams to continuously adapt their practices and performance based on the observed patterns the metrics reveal. In our experience, many new agile leads and teams are not sure which agile metrics would be the best metrics to begin using. Some teams may be tracking various data points, but lack the skill and understanding of what the metrics are actually revealing and how the teams can use this information to self-improve.

    Our presentation/workshop introduces four "light-weight" agile metrics any team can easily adopt and begin using immediately. They are: Velocity, Comitted vs. Done, Sprint Build-up (Burn-up), & Cycle Time.

    We introduce each of these metrics and explain what each one measures, how to obtain the data, and when it should be updated. But most importantly, our presentation provides a workshop component where we provide sample scenarios for each metric. These scenarios represent possible real-life data patterns teams could experience. In the workshop, we ask the audience to work in small groups to consider what each scenario may be representing and what they would do, in the spirit of continuous improvement, to respond to these patterns. We also discuss with the audience how to use the metrics in tandem to help provide a more robust interpretation of team performance.

    We realize there are many agile metrics teams can adopt. However, for teams just starting out we recommend these easy to use yet powerful metrics to help teams monitor and assess team performance.