Build Righter Stuff with HDD (Hypothesis Driven Development), a.k.a., HDD is TDD for the Business Case

With TDD (Test Driven Development) a coder writes a small test, and then just enough code to make the test pass, cleaning up the code along the way.  Imagine applying the same concepts to the business case.  Now stop imagining and use HDD (Hypothesis Driven Development) to test your business case and refactor it for success.

Our hands on session will cover the basics of ATDD (Acceptance Test Driven Development) and BDD (Behavior Driven Development) to specify by example, so all stakeholders get on the same conceptual page, developers build what the business really wants, and testers can prove it. 

But building what we want it not enough, so we will go further and use HDD to validate, or invalidate, business outcomes, focusing us on value instead of on adherence to specification.

This is a hands on session, so come with pen, paper and a readiness to learn by doing!

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  • Introduction: Our story, your facilitator
  • Bridging the Gap: What we asked for,what we need
  • xDD Driven Development: A brief overview of key agile testing approaches
  • Hands on Scenario: The majority of our session
  • Closing: Summary

Learning Outcome

  • Apply Acceptance Test Driven Development (ATDD) and Behavior Driven Development (BDD) to drive a shared understanding
  • Apply ATDD and BDD to improve business cases and rules
  • Apply Hypothesis Driven Development (HDD) to test a business case, just like we use TDD, ATDD and BDD to test our software
  • Test business outcomes
  • Move beyond adherence to specification to providing value

Target Audience

Developers, Testers, Program Managers, Product Managers, Product Owners, ScurmMasters

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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  • George Dinwiddie
    By George Dinwiddie  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    Good afternoon David,

    We have not yet received a response from you with respect to the invitation to present at AgileDC next month.  Please RSVP to the invitation sent on August 29th, or, alternately, via email that “I AM IN” to SPEAKERS@AGILEDC.ORG , by 11:59PM Sunday, September  7th, 2014 .  If we do not hear from you, we will have to forfeit your spot.

    Have a great weekend!  

    Best,

     

    George Dinwiddie and Phillip Manketo

     

    for the AgileDC organizing committee

  • George Dinwiddie
    By George Dinwiddie  ~  3 years ago
    reply Reply

    David, we decided to reclassify this as "Business Point of View." Is that OK with you?


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