Antifragile Change Leadership: Thriving in a Black Swan World

As the world continues to become increasingly interconnected and interdependent, Black Swans --- large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence --- are necessarily becoming more prominent!

While agility involves responding to change, antifragility involves gaining from disorder; and while agility emphasizes embracing change through inspecting and adapting, antifragility emphasizes embracing chaos or randomness through adapting and evolving!

While management focuses on complexity, leadership focuses on change! And while change management focuses on techniques for managing change, change leadership focuses on the capacity to lead change! With the proliferation of various models for “general leadership,” “change management,” and “change leadership” that focus on language or communication, relationships, and behaviors, no particular model has emerged as the preeminent “leadership model”!

As a result of the proliferation of volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, non-predictive decision making and change leadership are quintessential --- and individuals, teams & groups, and organizations & enterprises are embracing the quest for greater antifragility and require “antifragile change leadership” to realize greater employee engagement and market innovation & disruption!

We’ll explore Antifragility and Agility, Leadership and Management, and Change while sharing an empirically-derived agility and antifragility change leadership model that you can immediately put into practice with Scrum.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Have presented at http://bit.ly/DA-BA-WS, with great feedback.
Also interviewed at http://bit.ly/InfoQSi201502.

This extends last years Antifragility session.

---

This is a highly practical and engaging presentation, which is based on client consulting and coaching engagement, expressed through thought-provoking stories from which session participants will gain many practical take-aways/lessons-learned that they can immediately put into practice with Scrum. 

* Introduction
The topic is briefly introduced and its rationale is briefly elaborated.

* Antifragile Change Leadership
The core of this session focuses on exploring Antifragility & Agility, Leadership & Management, and Change Leadership & Change Management.
We’ll distill our exploration into Change Leader tendencies and styles as the foundation for Agile Change Leaders and Antifragile Change Leaders.
We’ll explore a few stories (based on client consulting and coaching engagement) and key practical lesson learned that participants can immediately leverage. Additionally, we’ll address any questions, etc.

* Conclusion
The session is closed...

This session provides participants the means to evaluate and foster antifragile change leadership with their teams and organization using Scrum.

Learning Outcome

  • Understand Antifragility & Agility with Scrum
  • Understand Leadership & Management with Scrum
  • Understand Change Leadership & Change Management with Scrum
  • Understand how Change Leader tendencies and styles distinguish between Agile Change Leaders and Antifragile Change Leaders
  • Understand how to put these concepts into practice with teams and organizations using Scrum

Target Audience

All

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

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