Have you wondered what helps make contracts deliver better results? It's not specifying Agile approaches, but thinking of the development life-cycle, its impacts, and asking for demonstrable understanding of Agile approaches.

This short talk will discuss how a contract vehicle was established at the Environmental Protection Agency to improve contractor accountability and more importantly improve system reliability. It will include a short discussion of what next steps for following contracts should be included.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

What were the problems being solved?

  • Development and maintenance were separated into multiple contracts
  • Development teams had little to no responsibility to produce maintainable software
  • This results in throwing it over the fence and in maintenance spelunking when there is a problem
  • Largest problem was an architectural issue that required months to change

What was the context? (Type of organization, information about the environment, team, technology, etc.)

  • Federal Govt Agency (Environmental Protection Agency/Office of Pesticide Programs (EPA/OPP)); takes in fees to register new pesticides and maintain exiting registrations (very little appropriations); examine pesticides in terms of human health & environmental impact and create a pesticide label on how to use the pesticide safely (label is the law)
  • Dev teams followed a waterfall process with a few hours hand-off to maintenance; additionally, the dev team did typical requirements analysis at start and UAT at end while maintenance team interacted with different parts of the business several times/week

Why was this important to solve or create?

  • EPA/OPP took in fees from registrants (manufacturers or their holding companies) that paid for people and systems (rather than appropriations sourced from taxes); failure to deliver these in the appropriate timeframe meant refunding the registrant – IT systems w/problems could contribute to this slowness
  • Not considering maintenance resulted in more problems for a different team to solve; this increased maintenance costs and reduced system reliability; system problems put the fees collected at risk for being refunded as well as potentially jeopardizing human health or the environment

What was done?

  • Created a full life-cycle BPA type contract to one vendor – this put both development and maintenance into the hands of one contractor – accountability!
  • Rather than specifying approach and techniques went with assessing past experience with Agile approaches and the results achieved along with how they thought these would apply to EPA/OPP
  • Made a quality assurance surveillance plan based on metrics – prioritized metrics differently in different task orders on the contract to allow the most important priorities to dictate how the contractor got evaluated
  • Main specification was a demonstrable practice of continuous improvement

What results were achieved?

  • Improved application maintenance; defects created and ‘spelunking’ time reduced
  • User understanding was also enhanced as Agile approaches started being used in the development area and even when they weren’t (i.e. waterfall was used), the experience of the contractor with the user in maintenance was invaluable

What were the next steps?

  • Improving metrics to increase technical health of products
  • Migrating several legacy systems to more modern architectures
  • Getting all teams focused on using agile approaches (more education on the government side)

Learning Outcome

Attendees will gain insight into -

  • leverage points for tying Agile principles to contracts
  • the relationship between contracts, development, and long-term sustainability through maintenance

Target Audience

Contracting Officers, Procurement Officials, Development Managers, CIOs/CTOs

Prerequisite

The attendee should understand that putting items on contract is a risk sharing relationship.

schedule Submitted 2 months ago

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