In this talk, we'll explore why some technologies end up inexplicably dominating our field while others fade away despite their obvious merits. What will it take for the languages we care about to succeed, and what are the consequences of success? Let's apply a broad perspective to the mess we've made of modern computer science, and explore our options for getting the situation back on track through a careful examination of history, science and ponies.

 
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Absolutely everybody

schedule Submitted 3 years ago

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  • Liked Thomas Gazagnaire
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    Thomas Gazagnaire - Compile your own cloud with Mirage OS v2.0

    60 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Most applications running in the cloud are not optimized to do so. They make assumptions about the underlying operating system, resulting in larger footprints with increased costs and risks.  The open source Mirage OS represents a new approach where the application code is combined with the specific components of the operating system it needs into a single-purpose unikernel appliance. With Mirage OS, developers can create lean and efficient unikernels for secure, cost-effective and high-performance network applications. Mirage OS unikernels run directly on the Xen Project hypervisor, which allows them to be quickly deployed to many leading cloud platforms.

    Mirage OS is fully written in OCaml, from the device drivers and network stack to higher-level synchronisation protocols and databases. In this presentation I will explain how we developed Mirage OS and why we choose to do so in a strongly typed functional language with a powerful module langage. I will then present some of the new features of Mirage OS v2.0 such as: support for ARM devices, Irmin: a Git-like distributed database and OCaml-TLS: a comprehensive implementation of the TLS protocol in pure OCaml. 

  • Liked Morten Kromberg
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    Morten Kromberg - Pragmatic Functional Programming using Dyalog

    Morten Kromberg
    Morten Kromberg
    CXO
    Dyalog
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 Mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    APL is a member of the family of languages that are approaching middle age (Ken Iverson’s book titled “A Programming Language” was published in 1962). APL was very influential in the 60’s and 70’s, and widely used to deliver “end user computing” - but although the REPL, dynamic scope and lack of a type system endeared APL to domain experts, it also drew fire from computer scientists, most famously when Edsger Dijkstra declared that “APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past it creates a new generation of coding bums.”

    Dyalog is a modern, array-first, multi-paradigm programming language, which supports functional, object-oriented and imperative programming based on an APL language kernel. Dyalog allows people with good ideas – from bright high school students to PhDs – to contribute directly to the software development process using a notation which fits comfortably with those used in their own domains. Subject matter experts can write prototypes or, with suitable training and/or support, highly efficient, parallel and robust code that can be embedded in high-performance production applications.

  • Liked Debasish Ghosh
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    Debasish Ghosh - Property based testing for functional domain models

    Debasish Ghosh
    Debasish Ghosh
    Consultant
    IRadix Inc
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Manual testing is something that's error prone, incomplete and impossible to replicate on a large scale. We have instead been using xUnit style of testing for quite some time now. This approach has a number of drawbacks like (a) We need to write test cases by hand which again doesn't scale for large systems (b) We may miss out some of the edge cases (c) Safeguarding missing cases with coverage metrics doesn't help, since metrics are mostly based on heuristics (d) maintaining test cases and test data is a real pain.

    In property based testing we write properties and not low level test cases. And let the system generate test cases which validate such properties. There are 2 main advantages with this approach:

    1. You think in terms of properties (or specifications) of the domain model which is the right granularity to think about
    2. You don't need to manage test cases, which is completely done by the system that generates a large collection of test data

    This approach is ideal for the functional programming paradigm, which focuses on pure functions. Using functional programming it's easier to reason about your model - hence it's easier to test functional programs using properties. In this talk I will take some real world examples of property validation and verification using scalacheck (the property based testing library for Scala) and a real world domain model.

  • Liked Dhaval Dalal
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    Dhaval Dalal / Ryan Lemmer - Code Jugalbandi

    60 Mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    In Indian classical music, we have Jugalbandi, where two lead musicians or vocalist engage in a playful competition. There is jugalbandi between Flutist and a Percussionist (say using Tabla as the instrument). Compositions rendered by flutist will be heard by the percussionist and will replay the same notes, but now on Tabla and vice-versa is also possible.

    In a similar way, we will perform Code Jugalbandi to see how the solution looks using different programming languages and paradigms.

    During the session, Dhaval and Ryan will take turns at coding the same problem using different languages and paradigms. There would be multiple such rounds during the Jugalbandi.

  • Liked Mushtaq Ahmed
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    Mushtaq Ahmed - Demystify the Reactive Jargons

    Mushtaq Ahmed
    Mushtaq Ahmed
    Mr Scala
    ThoughtWorks
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 Mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    Sync, Async, Blocking, Non-Blocking, Streaming are the buzzwords in the reactive programming world. This talk will attempt to attach some meaning to them. It will also demo the performance and resource consumption patterns for blocking-io, Scala Futures and RxJava Observables for comparable programs. Finally, a command line application that consumes twitter streams API will demo what is possible using the new reactive abstractions.

  • Liked Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan
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    Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan - An introduction to Continuation Passing Style (CPS)

    60 Mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    Traditionally functions return some value. Someone is waiting for that value and does some computation with it. This "someone" is called the continuation of this value. In a normal functional call, the continuation is "implicit". In the "continuation passing style" (hence forth called with the short form, CPS), we make the continuations explicit. In this style, function definitions take an extra argument called "continuation" and it never return. The "return value" of the function 'continues' by passing this value as an argument to the continuation. Continuations are sometimes called "gotos with arguments".

    CPS is used as an intermediate stage while compiling a program since it makes the control structure of the program explicit and hence can be converted easily to machine code. Another feature of a CPS-transformed function is that it is tail-recursive even if the original function was not written in a tail-recursive style.

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  • 90 Mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Code used during the talk: https://github.com/shashi/fuconf-talk
    Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16Xfqd-xU8y2JEN0TIcacDoYnp0b5-W7ESDB5v1SmcXs/edit#slide=id.p

     

    Elm is a strongly typed functional reactive programming (FRP) language that compiles to HTML, CSS, and Javascript. In Elm, the Signal type represents a time-varying value--things like mouse position, keys pressed, current time are signals. With Signals, one can write terse code that is isomorphic to a dataflow diagram of the app. The code hence feels natural and is 100% callback free. All this, with powerful type inference.

    This talk is an introduction to FRP. It explores functionally composing graphics and UIs, and creating interactions and animations with the Signal type. There will also be an overview of Elm’s execution mechanism and the time traveling debugger: a consequence of Elm's purely functional approach.

    While instructive, it will be good fun too, in the spirit of Elm.

  • Liked Mohit Thatte
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    Mohit Thatte - Purely functional data structures demystified

    Mohit Thatte
    Mohit Thatte
    Programmer
    Helpshift Inc.
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Immutable, persistent data structures form a big part of the value proposition of most functional programming languages.

    It is important to understand why these data structures are useful and how they make it easier to reason about your program. 

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    In this talk I will do a walkthrough of some of these data structures drawing from the work of Chris Okasaki[1], and attempt to explain the essential ideas in a simple way. 


    [1] Purely Functional Data Structures, Chris Okasaki, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University 

  • Liked Bhasker Kode
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    Bhasker Kode - Writing and improving tail recursive functions

    Bhasker Kode
    Bhasker Kode
    Building stuff
    Helpshift
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Brief history of recursion 

    Snippets from a few languages

    What is tail recursion?

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  • Liked Premanand Chandrasekaran
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    Premanand Chandrasekaran - Functional Programming in Java

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    Functional programming has started (re)gaining prominence in recent years, and with good reason too. Functional programs lend an elegant solution to the concurrency problem, result in more modular systems, are more concise and are easier to test. While modern languages like Scala and Clojure have embraced the functional style whole-heartedly, Java has lagged a bit behind in its treatment of functions as first-class citizens. With the advent of Java 8 and its support for lambdas, however, Java programmers can finally start reaping the power of functional programs as well. Even without Java 8, it is possible to adopt a functional style with the aid of excellent libraries such as Guava.

    This talk will explore how to apply functional concepts using the Java programming language and demonstrate how it can result in simpler, more elegant designs. We will conduct this in a hands-on workshop style with attendants being encouraged to code-along. So bring your favorite Java 8 aware IDE, an open mind and prepare to have a lot of fun.

  • Liked Rahul Goma Phulore
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    Rahul Goma Phulore - Object-functional programming: Beautiful unification or a kitchen sink?

    60 Mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Scala began its life as an experiment to “unify” object-oriented programming and functional programming. Martin Odersky believed that the differences between FP and OO are more cultural than technical, and that there was a room for beautifully unify various ideas from the two into one simple core.

    How successful has Scala been in its goals? Is it the like “the grand unified theory of universe” or like the infamous “vegetarian ham”? [1]

    In this talk, we will see just how Scala unifies various ideas – such as type-classes, algebraic data types, first-class modules, functions under one simple core comprising of traits, objects, implicits, and open recursion. We will how this unification unintendedly subsumes many concepts that require seprate features in other languages, such as functional dependencies, type families, GADTs in Haskell. We will see how this has given a rise to a new “implicit calculus”, which could lay a foundation for next generation of generic programming techniques.

    We will see that this unification comes at a certain cost, wherein it leads to some compromises on both sides. However many of these trade-offs are particular to Scala (largely due to the JVM imposed restrictions). The goal of unification is still noble, and we need not throw the baby out with the bathwater.

    [1]: https://twitter.com/bos31337/status/425524860345778176

  • Liked Venkat Subramaniam
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    Venkat Subramaniam - Haskell for Everyday Programmers

    90 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    I learn different languages not to make use of them, but to program in my current languages in a better way. As we adapt functional style of programming in mainstream languages, like Java, C#, and C++, we can learn a great deal from a language that is touted as a purely functional language.

    Haskell is statically typed, but not in a way like Java, C#, or C++. Its static typing does not get in the way of productivity. Haskell quietly does lazy evaluation and enforces functional purity for greater good. Everyday programmers, like your humble speaker, who predominantly code in mainstream languages, can greatly benefit from learning the idioms and style of this elegant language. The next time we sit down to crank out some code in just about any language, we can make use of some of those styles, within the confines of the languages, and move towards a better, functional style.

  • Liked Aditya Godbole
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    Aditya Godbole - Learning (from) Haskell - An experience report

    Aditya Godbole
    Aditya Godbole
    CTO
    Vertis Microsystems
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    45 Mins
    Experience Report
    Beginner

    Functional programming as a programming style and discipline is useful even in languages which are not pure functional languages. By practising programming in a pure functional language like Haskell, programmers can drastically improve the quality of code when coding in other languages as well.

    The talk is based on first hand experience of using Haskell in internal courses in our organisation to improve code quality.

    This talk will cover Gofer (one of the earliest variants of Haskell) as a teaching tool, including the choice of the language, the features from Haskell that should (and shouldn't) be covered and the obstacles and benefits of the exercise.

     

  • Liked Akash Manohar
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    Akash Manohar - Elixir Today: a round-up on state of Elixir and it's ecosystem

    60 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Elixir is a functional and dynamic language built on top of the Erlang VM. The development of the language is happening at a fast pace. People in the community have participated actively to write tools and libraries, required to write real-world apps in Eilxir.

    In this talk, I will attempt to skim through all the new features in Elixir, a few important libraries with short examples and some learning resources.

    Each tool showcased in this talk, will have a 3-step tryout, with the simplest example.

  • Liked Rahul Goma Phulore
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    Rahul Goma Phulore - Promise of a better future

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Futures and promises are no strangers to most programmers. They have made their way into major mainstream languages, including but not limited to, Java, C#, JavaScript, and C++.

    This abstraction however is typically dreaded due to the way they’re typically done. Most manifestations lead to the insidious callback hell, and some, like Java’s, are incredulously limited.

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    We will also go over some syntactic-transformation based approaches (basically, macros), such as C#’s async-await, and see how it compares with the functional approaches discussed earlier.

  • Liked Anil Wadghule
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    Anil Wadghule - SOLID: the next step is Functional

    45 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    As Object Oriented programmers, we follow SOLID Design Principles for improving OO design of our applications.

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    This talk explains about how applying SOLID Design principles like Single Responsibility Principle (SRP) leads to many small classes. Furthermore, if you rigorously apply the Interface Segregation Principle (ISP), you'll eventually arrive at the ultimate Role Interface: an interface with a single method.

    If you apply the SRP and ISP like that, you're likely to evolve a code base with many fine-grained classes that each have a single method.

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    This talk will enlighten how applying Object Oriented Design Principles to their extreme will lead you to Functional Programming.

    It's necessary for Object Oriented programmer to understand why Functional programming makes sense.

    At the end, this talk will also cover essential basics of Functional programming needed to be known for every Object Oriented Programmer.

  • Liked Shakthi Kannan
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    Shakthi Kannan - Lambdaaaaaaaaaa Calculus

    Shakthi Kannan
    Shakthi Kannan
    DevOps Engineer
    Self
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 Mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    This talk is an introduction on lambda calculus and will address the foundations of functional programming languages.

    We will learn the building blocks of lambda calculus - syntax, rules, and application.

  • Liked Rahul Goma Phulore
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    Rahul Goma Phulore - You could have invented monads!

    45 Mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    Of all the computational abstractions that functional programming has brought to the table, monads seem to be disproportionately more popular than the rest. (Or should I say, notorious?) The web is filled with monad tutorials, ranging from those using pure mathematics to explain the idea, to those using (half-baked) metaphors like burritos and space-suites. One might think this should make it relatively easy to grok monads. Unfortunately, many of these tutorials do a rather poor job, and do not help students gain an intuition for the idea. This has resulted in an unparalleled FUD around monads.

    A part of difficulty people have when learning functional programming abstractions such as monads comes from the fact that, this new way of thinking involves looking for abstraction opportunities in places they’re not used to.

    In this talk, I will start by presenting some seemingly unrelated day-to-day code examples. I will underline the problems common to all of them, and then we will all together derive a general abstraction applicable to all of them. If you can follow through till the last bit (and in my experience, most of the audience does), you have not only understood but essentially re-invented monads!

  • Liked Venkat Subramaniam
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    90 Mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    As Java programmers we have used a number of design patterns and design techniques. With the introduction of lambda expressions, we now have some more sharper tools in our design toolbox. Come to this presentation to learn how we can implement some elegant design ideas with lambda expressions. We will learn about these design techniques, not using diagrams, but by realizing the ideas in code.

  • Liked Mushtaq Ahmed
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    Mushtaq Ahmed - Typeclasses as objects and implicits

    Mushtaq Ahmed
    Mushtaq Ahmed
    Mr Scala
    ThoughtWorks
    schedule 3 years ago
    Sold Out!
    60 Mins
    Tutorial
    Intermediate

    Haskell has populairzed typelcasses a principled way to add ad-hoc extensions on existing data types. They allow you to 1) add new operations on existing data types and 2) support new data types on existing operations, and thus solve the famous "expression problem".

    There is a lot of similarily between typeclasses and Java good practices of programming to interfaces and preferring composition over inheritance. The missing link is the implicit dictionary passing which allows haskell to be much more concise and expressive.

    In this tutorial, we will look at how Scala adopts typeclasses by adding the missing link of implicits.