• Liked John Hughes
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    Why Functional Programming Matters

    John Hughes
    John Hughes
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    25 years ago I published "Why Functional Programming Matters", a manifesto for FP--but the subject is much older than that!

    As software becomes more and more complex, it is more and more important to structure it well. Well-structured software is easy to write, easy to debug, and provides a collection of modules that can be re-used to reduce future programming costs. Conventional languages place conceptual limits on the way problems can be modularised. Functional languages push those limits back. In this paper we show that two features of functional languages in particular, higher-order functions and lazy evaluation, can contribute greatly to modularity. As examples, we manipulate lists and trees, program several numerical algorithms, and implement the alpha-beta heuristic (an algorithm from Artificial Intelligence used in game-playing programs). Since modularity is the key to successful programming, functional languages are vitally important to the real world.

    In this talk we'll take a deep dive into history to revisit our personal selection of highlights.

  • Liked Morten Kromberg
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    Array Oriented Functional Programming with Dyalog

    Morten Kromberg
    Morten Kromberg
    Roger Hui
    Roger Hui
    schedule 6 months ago
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    480 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    Dyalog is a modern, array-first, multi-paradigm programming language, which supports functional, object-oriented and imperative programming based on an APL language kernel. During the morning and early afternoon, we will explore the fundamentals of functional programming in APL. At the end of the day, Dyalog CXO Morten Kromberg will round off with an application development session, showing how a simple application with a HTML5/JS front-end and a RESTful web service can be used to deliver the power of APL to end users, or as embeddable components for other application tools. The "hands on" sections of the workshop can be followed under Mac OS X, Linux, or Microsoft Windows.

  • Liked Tamizhvendan S
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    Rethinking "State Management."

    Tamizhvendan S
    Tamizhvendan S
    schedule 9 months ago
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    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    Persisting the State is an integral part of any application, and it profoundly influences how we architect the application. But do we need to store the state in the first place? Is there any alternative?

    Together, let's experience a difference perspective of State Management.

  • Liked Abdulsattar Mohammed
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    Dependently Typed Programming with Idris

    Abdulsattar Mohammed
    Abdulsattar Mohammed
    schedule 1 year ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Types allow us to structure data to match the functional requirements of the problem we are trying to solve. But, in most languages, we end up choosing/building types that are the closest to our requirement. They don't exactly fit our bill, as a result of which, we write runtime code to enforce those conditions. Then we write tests because the compiler can't help us. Dependently Typed Languages like Idris allow us to encode a wide range of invariants into the type itself allowing us to possibly have zero runtime errors.

  • Liked Bartosz Bąbol
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    Magic at compile time. Metaprogramming in Scala

    Bartosz Bąbol
    Bartosz Bąbol
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Don't use metaprogramming! Don't use macros! You will often hear those statements. But metaprogramming or speaking more specific macros are heavily used in scala ecosystem. Almost every big project in functional or "reactive" technology stack uses them somewhere under the hood. What are macros? Why they are so controversial? What macros can offer to an engineer? Why they are useful? How they can minimize amount of boilerplate code? After answering those questions by showing small examples, we will start to develop library(or maybe better term will be DSL) for parsing XML.

    But there is something more I didn't mention. If you are familiar with Scala ecosystem and up to date with roadmap of new Scala versions, you should be aware that...MACROS ARE DEAD. So why bother? Because there is new, bright future of metaprogramming in Scala called Scala Meta. We will see that knowledge gained after learning macros will be helpful when we will learn new approach presented in Scala Meta.

  • Liked Aloïs Cochard
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    Welcome to the Machines

    Aloïs Cochard
    Aloïs Cochard
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    The streaming of data in a purely functional language is a fascinating problem that have been extensively explored over the years.

    In this talk we'll first briefly outline historical solutions to the problem and discuss their advantages and disadvantages,
    we will then follow with a practical introduction to the great `machines` library from Edward Kmett.

    We will see how the library usage compare to other players in the ecosystem (pipes, conduit, ...),
    and walk through real world examples giving us a chance to write our own combinators and understand some of the internals.

  • Liked Rahul Muttineni
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    Bringing the Power of Haskell to the JVM

    Rahul Muttineni
    Rahul Muttineni
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Advanced

    The JVM is a state-of-the-art, cross-platform virtual machine supported by the vast Java platform and ecosystem, but is cursed with an ancient and clumsy language that is slowly modernizing. Haskell is a state-of-the-art programming language with immature platform and tooling and no commercial development of its primary implementation. GHCVM's objective is to combine the best of both worlds and reap the benefits.

    In this talk, I will share my journey of how I waded through the internals of GHC and got Haskell and Java to play nice with each other.  

  • Liked Sathish Kumar
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    Real world functional programming in Ads serving

    Sathish Kumar
    Sathish Kumar
    schedule 6 months ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    This talk will be about how we applied Typed functional programming and object-functional concepts inspired from languages like Scala, Haskell in building an Ads serving engine using Java 8 and made the stack extensible for multiple Ads serving usecases like App, Desktop, Exchange and ML model execution for CTR prediction, Guaranteed delivery etc.

    This talk will focus on how we solved problems in an Ads serving engine using functional programming constructs for:

    • Relevance and Ranking
    • CTR prediction
    • Bidding models
    • Guaranteed delivery (Convex Optimization)
    • Explore / Exploit (Multi-armed bandit)
    • Attribution, Deduplication etc

    From a language level, it will focus on how we applied our learnings from other functional languages like Scala, Clojure, Haskell in Java 8 to write elegant code for:

    • Composing Ad selection workflows from reusable components
    • Reasoning about code through immutability
    • Defining interfaces like function types. Functions as first class objects to express behaviour.
    • Using Builders and Filter predicates for adding new features
    • Transforming collections using streams, lambdas, map, reduce, flatMap, groupBy
    • Optional for writing null safe code and handling defaults using map, flatMap, orElse
    • Functional operations like partition, zip for simplifying code
    • Pattern matching and other features from libraries
    • Caching and memoization
  • Liked Debasish Ghosh
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    An algebraic approach to functional domain modeling

    Debasish Ghosh
    Debasish Ghosh
    schedule 8 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Intermediate

    Domain modeling is usually implemented using OO design. In this approach of "nouns-first" we design object hierarchies using subtyping to model the various elements of the domain. In this talk we will take a different approach using Scala:

    1. Start with focus on verbs first
    2. Think how we can model domain behaviors using pure functions grouped within extensible modules
    3. Use an algebraic approach towards evolution of modules,the algebra being composed of functions,types & laws
    4. See how the domain algebra can be constructed from categorical structures like monoids, functors & monads
    5. Discuss how the functional patterns lead to compositionality - an extremely important quality that scales your domain model.

  • Liked Yogesh Sajanikar
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    Implementing Spark like system in Haskell

    Yogesh Sajanikar
    Yogesh Sajanikar
    schedule 1 year ago
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    90 mins
    Demonstration
    Intermediate

    The session will present design and implementation of Hspark. A library that implements a framework to enable running a distributed map-reduce job over a set of nodes. The session will also showcase an extensible DSL to specify distributed map-reduce job.

    The session will focus mainly on 

    • Creation of DSL (Specification) for map reduce. The DSL is similar (actually based on) Apache Spark
    • Translation of DSL into scheduling the jobs across the nodes, and
    • Executing and handling failures.

    Current implementation of hspark is at https://github.com/yogeshsajanikar/hspark and implements first two points mentioned above. Currently, I am trying to enforce it with separation of execution framework so that failures can be handled correctly.

    Note that this project was implemented as a part of course project for CS240H at Stanford. The implementation details can be found at http://www.scs.stanford.edu/16wi-cs240h/projects/sajanikar.pdf

     

     

  • Liked Shantanu Kumar
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    Performance optimization with Code-as-data in Clojure

    Shantanu Kumar
    Shantanu Kumar
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Advanced

    Homoiconicity (code as data, data as code) is one of the hallmarks of Lisp. Clojure, a Lisp-1 language, has this wonderful feature too. In this talk I will discuss about performance optimization techniques that leverage homoiconicity.

    No discussion on performance optimization can happen without discussing performance benchmarking. In this talk I will show how to do comparative benchmarking while trying to find performance bottlenecks. I will then proceed to showing techniques on using Clojure's homoiconicity to optimize performance. I will also show how to discover latency breakup of any Clojure code in a waterfall-chart model using homoiconicity.

  • Liked 	Robert Virding
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    The Erlang Ecosystem

    	Robert Virding
    Robert Virding
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Keynote
    Intermediate

    Erlang is in many ways quite old though many of the problems for which it used are quite modern. The Erlang language and system was designed around a set of requirements for telecom systems. They were distributed, massively concurrent systems which had to scale with demand, be capable of handling massive peak loads and never fail. The Erlang concurrency and error-handling model was developed around these requirements. We will describe the development of the language and the design of systems based on the Erlang showing how well the functional paradigm suits attacking these types of problems. We will also look at the further development with the introduction of new languages in the Erlang environment - the Erlang ecosystem.

  • Liked Pushkar Kulkarni
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    Going Swiftly Functional

    Pushkar Kulkarni
    Pushkar Kulkarni
    Mamatha Busi
    Mamatha Busi
    schedule 7 months ago
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    90 mins
    Tutorial
    Beginner

    Two years after its introduction, the Swift programming language finds itself at rank # 14 on the TIOBE index for July 2016. Some of the prime reasons for Swift’s meteoric rise are its carefully designed syntax and semantics - it borrows heavily from the best features of a wide range of languages. The syntax is intuitive and new Swift learners can often relate it to the language of their choice. Introduced primarily as a client-side language, Swift was open sourced in December 2015 via swift.org. Since then, there has been a community effort on extending its capabilities to the server side too. Swift is available on Linux today, and it is poised to become a language enabling end to end development - from mobile apps to server backends. 

    Swift falls in the category of “modern native languages” - like Rust and Go. These runtimes run code in bare metal, boosting performance. They are statically, strongly typed and with type-inference. This makes them safe. Their modern syntax also makes them expressive enough for high level abstractions like those seen in functional programming. They try to solve some of the tradeoffs that languages of the past battled with. On the other hand, functional programming has found new oxygen in the last couple of years when agile methodologies become as pervasive as multicore hardware . While we do have languages like Haskell that are purely functional and provide excellent support to express functional concepts, it is important to separate functional thinking away from the language. Functional programming is supported by most of the languages today because the returns of it in terms of expression, conciseness, readability, correctness and performance are unmatched. Swift is not a purely functional language. However, it provides syntactic and semantic support for functional programming to a large extent.

  • Liked Ankit Solanki
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    Using F# in production: a retrospective

    Ankit Solanki
    Ankit Solanki
    schedule 6 months ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    We (ClearTax) build a full product in F#, and it's been in production for two years now. This talk will cover our learnings from building this product – what we did well and what went wrong. We will discuss the joys and the challenges that come with using a functional language day-in and day-out.

    I want to share our journey, so the community can learn from our experiences and we can get feedback from the experts as well.

     

     

  • Liked Viral B. Shah
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    Julia - A Lisp for Fast Number Crunching

    Viral B. Shah
    Viral B. Shah
    Shashi Gowda
    Shashi Gowda
    schedule 6 months ago
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    90 mins
    Workshop
    Intermediate

    Julia is a programming language for data science and numerical computing. Julia is a high-level, high-performance dynamic language, it uses just-in-time compilation to provide fast machine code - dynamic code runs at about half the speed of C, and orders of magnitude faster than traditional numerical computing tools.

    Julia borrows two main ideas from Lisp lore:

    1. Multiple-dispatch: a method is identified by a name and the types of all of its arguments (traditional OOP only uses the type of a single argument) multiple-dispatch allows for a natural programming model suitable for mathematics and general purpose programming. Interestingly, the same feature is responsible for Julia's ability to generate really fast machine code.
    2. Macros: Julia has syntax that is familiar to users of other technical computing environments, however, Julia expressions are homoiconic -- Julia code can be represented as Julia data structures, and transformed from one form to another via hygienic macros. There are some very interesting uses of macros to create domain-specific languages for effective programming. 
  • Liked 	Brian McKenna
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    No Silver Bullets in Functional Programming

    	Brian McKenna
    Brian McKenna
    schedule 6 months ago
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    45 mins
    Keynote
    Beginner

    We are constantly presented with trade-offs when writing software. What are the trade-offs when applying functional programming? What costs arise? When is it not worth doing? When should pragmatism kick in and when should we start using side-effects?

    This talk will give you some tools to be able to answer the above questions for both functional programming and types. The tools have been refined over many professional years of both doing and not doing purely functional programming.

  • Liked Morten Kromberg
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    Notation for Parallel Thought

    Morten Kromberg
    Morten Kromberg
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Talk
    Beginner

    Since the original APL\360 interpreter saw the light of day in 1966, a large part of the of primitive functions in APL (A Programming Language) implicitly map operations to all elements of array arguments (and arrays of numbers or characters are the only “types” available in the language). Over the decades, the parallelism at the core of the notation has been extended, to nested arrays in the 80’s and arrays of objects in the 00’s. In this decade, arrays of futures have been added to provide users of APL with the ability to express asynchronous – but deterministic -algorithms.

    This talk will introduce the most important parallel constructs available in current Dyalog APL, which (despite the name) essentially remains an executable mathematical notation.

  • Liked Naresha K
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    Pure Functional Programming on JVM with Frege

    Naresha K
    Naresha K
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Demonstration
    Beginner

    JVM is one of the most widely used platforms and has attracted several languages. Though functional programming support is available through several languages, developers targeting JVM do not have an option that combines static typing with pure functional programming. Frege tries to address this space by providing a Haskell implementation on JVM. It comes with a good support for Java interoperability too.

    I will be presenting this topic from the context of a developer targeting Java platform looking for pure functional programming options, not as a Haskell developer targeting JVM.

  • Liked Roger Hui
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    A Tour (de Force) of APL in 16 Expressions

    Roger Hui
    Roger Hui
    schedule 10 months ago
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    90 mins
    Workshop
    Beginner

    APL will be 50 years old in November 2016 (50 years from 1966-11-27 15.53.58, to be exact), and it remains unsurpassed in manifesting Kenneth E. Iverson’s five important characteristics of notation

    • ease of expression
    • suggestivity
    • subordination of detail
    • economy
    • amenability to proof

    These characteristics are demonstrated by working through 16 APL expressions. The material is approachable for beginners and yet thought-provoking for experts.

    One of the 16 expressions is a fast computation of the partition function without use of the Hardy-Ramanujan (1918) results.

     

  • Liked Manoj Govindan
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    Erlang in a Financial Startup: A War Story

    Manoj Govindan
    Manoj Govindan
    schedule 7 months ago
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    45 mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate
    My employer has a successful suite of products that grew out of a monolithic app. When the monolith was split into different products and services one particular service had requirements that were naturally met by  Erlang: distributed execution,  fault tolerance, and horizontal scalability. I've been working on an implementation of this service that meets the above requirements while retaining the existing interface and features. 
     
    In this presentation, I'll explain how I've created a solution combining Erlang with an existing heterogeneous stack that includes the JVM (Java/Scala), R, Perl, Python, and Javascript. The presentation is a summary of my  ongoing work on this solution, the key challenges I faced, their solutions, and the future road map for the project. 
     
     
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