Refactoring to Functional Programming (with Java 8)

With Java 8’s lambda functions, Java now supports functional programming. Moving to functional programming can result in significantly better code and productivity gains. However, it requires a paradigm shift: you need to move away from imperative and object-oriented thinking to start thinking functionally. That’s what this session will help you achieve: it will help you make your shift towards functional programming. Bring-in your laptops and you can get your hands dirty refactoring imperative/OO code to functional code in Java 8! 

Attraction: Illustration of how you can perform automatic refactoring to lambdas using your favourite IDE. Special feature: Live demo of refactoring open source legacy code base to show how lambdas and streams can result in shorter and effective code. 

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Tutorial

Outline/structure of the Session

* Introduction to lambdas and streams API (10 minutes) 

* Warm-up: Refactoring to lambda functions and functional interfaces (25 minutes) 

* Into the rapids: Hands-on with streams API (25 minutes) 

* Live demo: Refactoring legacy code to modern Java 8 code (15 minutes) 

* Using tools/IDEs for refactoring to Java 8 (10 minutes) 

* Wrap-up and Q & A (5 minutes) 

Learning Outcome

* How to convert imperative code (loops and conditionals) to functional code (lambdas and streams) 

* Know-how of approach to apply functional programming concepts in practice 

* When & how to use IDEs for automatic refactoring vs. manual refactoring 

Target Audience

Developers, leads, architects

schedule Submitted 4 years ago

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