Proofs, Derivations, Tests

schedule Nov 18th 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM place Grand Ball Room 2 people 4 Attending

John Hughes and Mary Sheeran in Why Functional Programming Matters [0] list “algebra as a litmus test” as one of the four salient features of functional programming, and Ken Iverson in Notation as a Tool of Thought [1] lists “amenability to formal proof” as one of the five important characteristics of notation. Using the language APL, we prove the correctness of some programs, derive simplifications, and illustrate design validation and program test techniques for functional programs.

[0] Hughes, John, and Mary Sheeran, Why Functional Programming Matters, Code Mesh, London, 2015-11-02 to -04.

[1] Iverson, Kenneth E., Notation as a Tool of Thought, Communications of the ACM, volume 23, number 8, 1980-08.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

0. Introduction

1. Proofs
     1.1 Sum of the Integers
     1.2 Triangular Matrix Inverse
     1.3 Cholesky Decomposition
     1.4 Ackermann’s Function

2. Derivations
     2.1 ...

3. Tests
     3.1 Assertions
     3.2 The Diamond Kata
     3.3 Tolerant Nub
     3.4 Dyadic Transpose

References

Learning Outcome

The attendees will gain appreciation of the use of formal techniques in functional programming.

 

Target Audience

Anyone interested in the use of formal techniques in functional programming.

schedule Submitted 5 months ago

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