schedule Dec 16th 10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place Board Room 1 people 11 Interested

Let's Lens presents a series of exercises, in a similar format to the Data61 functional programming course material. The subject of the exercises is around the concept of lenses, initially proposed by Foster et al., to solve the view-update problem of relational databases.

The theories around lenses have been advanced significantly in recent years, resulting in a library, implemented in Haskell, called lens.

This workshop will take you through the basic definition of the lens data structure and its related structures such as traversals and prisms. Following this we implement some of the low-level lens library, then go on to discuss and solve a practical problem that uses all of these structures.

 
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Learning Outcome

An attendee who completes this workshop should expect to confidently use the lens library, or other similar libraries, in their every day programming.

Target Audience

All

schedule Submitted 4 months ago

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  • Shrikant Savadatti
    By Shrikant Savadatti  ~  1 month ago
    reply Reply

    Hi Tony,

    To attend this workshop, is it necessary to have experience in Haskell? Is experience with Scala enough?

    • Tony Morris
      By Tony Morris  ~  1 month ago
      reply Reply

      Hi Shrikant,
      I think it would be quite a struggle without any Haskell experience. I am happy to catch up before the day and see what we can do to get you up to speed if you like?

      • Shrikant Savadatti
        By Shrikant Savadatti  ~  1 month ago
        reply Reply

        Sure, we can catch up before the day. Thanks. 

        • Tony Morris
          By Tony Morris  ~  1 month ago
          reply Reply

          No prob, just shoot me an email and we can see where we are at.


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