Pre-Conf Workshop

Wed, Nov 13
09:30

    Registration - 30 mins

10:00
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    Bruce Tate

    Bruce Tate - Designing Elixir Systems with OTP

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 7 Interested

    You know how to code in Elixir; now learn to think in it. Learn to design libraries with intelligent layers that shape the right data structures, flow from one function into the next, and present the right APIs. Embrace the same OTP that’s kept our telephone systems reliable and fast for over 30 years. Move beyond understanding the OTP functions to knowing what’s happening under the hood, and why that matters. Using that knowledge, instinctively know how to design systems that deliver fast and resilient services to your users, all with an Elixir focus.

    Elixir is gaining mindshare as the programming language you can use to keep your software running forever, even in the face of unexpected errors and an ever-growing need to use more processors. This power comes from an effective programming language, an excellent foundation for concurrency and its inheritance of a battle-tested framework called the OTP.

    If you’re using frameworks like Phoenix or Nerves, you’re already experiencing the features that make Elixir an excellent language for today’s demands. This book shows you how to go beyond simple programming to designing, and that means building the right layers. Embrace those data structures that work best in functional programs and use them to build functions that perform and compose well, layer by layer, across processes. Test your code at the right place using the right techniques. Layer your code into pieces that are easy to understand and heal themselves when errors strike.

    Of all Elixir’s boons, the most important one is that it guides us to design our programs in a way to most benefit from the architecture that they run on. The experts do it and now you can learn to design programs that do the same.

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    Michael Snoyman

    Michael Snoyman - Applied Haskell Workshop

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place Meeting Room 2 people 12 Interested

    This full day workshop will focus on applying Haskell to normal, everyday programming. We'll be focusing on getting comfortable with common tasks, libraries, and paradigms, including:

    • Understanding strictness, laziness, and evaluation
    • Data structures
    • Structuring applications
    • Concurrency and mutability
    • Library recommendations

    By the end of the workshop, you should feel confident in working on production Haskell codebases. While we obviously cannot cover all topics in Haskell in one day, the goal is to empower attendees with sufficient knowledge to continue developing their Haskell skillset through writing real applications.

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    Anne Ogborn

    Anne Ogborn - Introduction to Logic Programming and SWI-Prolog

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place PRD Boardroom people 3 Interested

    As machine learning matures, it is becoming obvious that we need explainable solutions. As functional programming matures it becomes obvious that we need inference and nondeterminism. And linked open data demands reasoning. This all day workshop will introduce the logic programming paradigm, in which programs are expressed as a set of logical rules and executed by finding proofs of queries.

    SWI-Prolog is the most highly developed and widely used language for logic programming.

    The language, which has been in continuous use in academic research settings since it's invention in 1972, provides unparalleled power. Many problems which would be difficult to express in other languages are simple in SWI-Prolog. SWI-Prolog is a 'batteries included' modern language, ready for real world tasks like web development and process control.

    In this dynamic hands on workshop we'll learn the basics of SWI-Prolog, and look at some of the amazing things it can do.

Bootcamp Day

Thu, Nov 14
09:30

    Registration - 30 mins

10:00
10:45
11:00
11:30
11:45
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    Naresha K .

    Naresha K . - Eclipse Collections, Java Streams & Vavr - What's in them for Functional Programming

    schedule  11:45 AM - 12:30 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 1 Interested

    Intuitive collections types can certainly help developers positively in terms of increased developer productivity and higher readability. As a developer on JVM you have plenty of options from the community. In this presentation, I compare three popular collections libraries - Eclipse Collections, Java Streams API, and Vavr. I present the code examples using all the three APIs. I firmly believe, there is no one library that is perfect for all situations. Hence we compare these libraries along the dimensions of mutability/ immutability, eager/lazy evaluation, richness of expression, error handling aspects. By the end of the presentation, we identify the strong areas for each of these APIs.

12:00
12:40
12:45
01:25
02:00
02:15
02:30
03:00
03:30
04:00
04:25
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    Kunjan Dalal

    Kunjan Dalal - Gentle introduction to TypeLevel stack (lots of Cats) via Web Development

    schedule  04:25 - 05:10 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 1 Interested

    People always talked about beautiful apps, be it web or mobile. Create a crazy number of frameworks to make your frontend work as fast as possible. But they mostly forget about the backend part, called the server-side application.

    TypeLevel stack provides wonderful sets of purely functional libraries to write backend code. A backend can be a simple monolith server or micro-service styled multi-server application. TypeLevel stack allows you to write your server code with less error and more confidence. TypeLevel stack has libraries for almost everything from doing Http to database access.

    In this talk, I will tell you why anyone should TypeLevel stack to build a backend application. I will also share little bit controversial opinionated way to arrange things. It will also showcase how composability of functional programming helps to write the scalable application.

05:00
05:15
05:45

Apply FP

Fri, Nov 15
09:00

    Registration - 30 mins

09:30
10:15

    Welcome Address & Apply FP Day Overview - 15 mins

10:30

    Coffee/Tea Break - 30 mins

11:00
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    Michael Snoyman

    Michael Snoyman - Your first Haskell web app with WAI and Warp

    schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Ball Room 1 people 3 Interested

    Haskell's Web Application Interface (WAI- pronounced "why") provides an abstraction between web applications and web servers. This allows many different web frameworks (e.g., Yesod, Spock, and Servant) to share servers like Warp and middlewares.

    Haskell's web frameworks offer a wide variety of feature sets, type-level and metaprogramming, and intended use cases. And for most use cases, I would recommend using an existing web framework, which will help you avoid common pitfalls and more quickly address common use cases.

    But not today! In this tutorial, we're going to step through building a functioning web server using just the bare-bones WAI interface and Warp as a server. Familiarity with the basics of Haskell will be a plus, but this will be a talk open to all FP and Haskell skill levels.

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    Adam Granicz

    Adam Granicz - Full-stack, functional web development on WebAssembly with F# and Bolero

    schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Ball Room 2

    Bolero (http://fsbolero.io) is a functional, reactive web development library for F# developers targeting WebAssembly via Blazor. Next to building on a familiar Model-View-Update (MVU) architecture, Bolero also integrates a number of power features from WebSharper (http://websharper.com) to enable ultra-efficient, full-stack F# web applications. By plugging into the ever-growing Blazor ecosystem, you will enjoy developing most of your code base without JavaScript, and discover a new and promising alternative to building performant web applications. Come to this talk and learn everything you need to know about developing Bolero applications, and jumpstart your productivity with skills that will leave any Blazor developer impressed.

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    Tamizhvendan S

    Tamizhvendan S - Building an E-Commerce Marketplace Middleware in Clojure

    schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Meeting Room 1 people 1 Interested

    Have you ever wondered how we can build a real-world, production-ready, end-to-end application using the functional programming principles? Immutability, Pure Functions and all other functional programming things sound good on paper but How can we build something useful by applying it?

    At Ajira, We recently built an e-commerce marketplace middleware in Clojure for a leading retail chain to sell their products on multiple e-commerce sites seamlessly. In this case study, we are going to build a minimal version of this project using which I will be sharing how we implemented it.

12:00
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    Tony Morris

    Tony Morris - An Intuition for List Folds

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Ball Room 1 people 3 Interested

    In this talk, we go back to first principles, defining and examining the definition for a cons list, then take a look at the ubiquitous right and left fold functions on a list.

    The primary focus of this talk is to develop an intuition for how these functions work so that we can best decide when to apply them. Multiple programming languages will be used to help emphasise the independence of the gained intuition. This talk will generally be interactive with the audience as we solve problems and build confidence in our new knowledge.

    Knowing how to apply the various list fold functions is a common question by the student of FP. This talk aims to provide a solid, reliable answer to this question. No prior understanding of list folds is necessary.

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    Harald Schult Ulriksen

    Harald Schult Ulriksen - From C# monolith to functional actors with Orleans and F#

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Ball Room 2

    This is an experience talk from my work with NRK, the

    Norwegian Broadcasting Company, Norway's public broadcaster.

    Over the last 3-4 years we've taken the TV and radio streaming sites from a monolith to multiple

    domain based services. We'll look at how we've transitioned the from a pure object oriented development team to a function friendly organzation, how gorwing the organization forced us to work with Conways law, as well as a deep dive into the bounded context of personalization.

    Keeping track of user progress and favorite shows is the responsibility of Personalization domain, with high performance requirements and surprisingly

    complex business rules. With new business rules and changing architecture, Personalization was in dire need of work. Combining FSharp and its typesystem and immutability with Orleans, an open source Virtual Actor platform for distributed high-scale computing applications, provided us with functional programming with OO principles in a fast and scalable platform. I'll show why we chose this path, the benefits we gained going from C# to F# and some of the lessons learned building on an actor model.

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    Yogesh Sajanikar

    Yogesh Sajanikar - Approximating time series data

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 3 Interested

    Overview

    IOT is ubiquitous now a days. With time series data pouring in from all possible sources, there is an increasing need to process the data at near real time. However, the transmission, storage and compute cost associated with this data is ever increasing.

    Approximation of Time Series

    In this talk, we will look at discrete transforms implemented using Haskell, combined with streaming libraries such as conduit/streamly. We will look at how we can use discrete wavelet transform to use with stream, where we do not know the size of the stream beforehand.

    Then we will look at how this data can be used to create and update sketches for supporting aggregation query on the time series data. We conclude that using approximate time series is very beneficial in applications such as IOT analytics, finance etc. We will also see how a simple Haskell list based application can be scaled using conduit not only for ingesting data, but also for querying it dynamically.

    Use Case

    Especially, we will look at CPU utilization of few machines and present the comparative study between query over raw CPU utilization data, and same queries over approximate time series.

    Current Status

    Currently being studied at my organization, such functional application is found to be useful in representing data for quick analytics.

12:45

    Lunch - 75 mins

02:00
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    Aditya Athalye

    Aditya Athalye - Dr. StrangePipes or: How I learned to stop worrying && "function" in Shell

    schedule  02:00 - 03:30 PM place Ball Room 1 people 3 Interested

    What scares the Shell out of people?

    Artefacts of the long and idiosyncratic history of Unix.

    We have so many powerful, stable, widely-available Unix tools and standards, but also plenty of inconsistencies, variants, and arcane caveats; enough to help us... surprise... ourselves in creative new ways. See that cliff you're currently falling off? Yeah, someone went down that road when you were still eating chalk in kindergarten. (Or perhaps you fell off it once before, when I was eating chalk in kindergarten, but it was so long ago that you forgot you've been there done that :-))

    Worse, there's no adult supervision, only user manuals. Within Shell's neon-lit environs, one must learn to tread with care, creativity, and cool calculation.

    One must learn to accept the silent echo as reward for success.

    Why go to Shell at all?

    Several of us already get by just fine with a few memorised spells from Shell. That's not a bad way to live, but we miss out on tremendous everyday value that we can unlock with the Unix way.

    For there exists a vast no-man's land between memorised tricks and large scale "designed" solutions; wherein no single software tool can really solve all the problems we encounter.

    Yet, any modern *nix PC has all one needs to adequately and speedily tailor-make solutions for almost any problem we may encounter in the underserved no man's land.

    Solutions that we can use effectively until we truly hit the kind of scale problems or domain complexity that merit use of specialised tools.

    Unix nature is deeply Functional

    The Unix tools philosophy naturally leads to functional architectures that can scale almost effortlessly. And functional programmers could do worse than learn to exploit such power.

    I'll just leave you with Douglas McIlroy's answer to "Read a file of text, determine the n most frequently used words, and print out a sorted list of those words along with their frequencies.", as seen in More Shell, Less Egg:

    tr -cs A-Za-z '\n' |
    tr A-Z a-z |
    sort |
    uniq -c |
    sort -rn |
    sed ${1}q

    A purely functional, automatically buffered data processing pipeline, built with standard reusable parts, written in 1986, directly usable on today's computers.

    Imaginative Functional Programmers (aren't we all?!) will find striking parallels between the facilities, concepts, and design principles available in their $Langs, and their *nix environments.

    No surprise, because in the dreamy mists of time, the wise hackers of Unix lore, and SmallTalk lore, and APL lore, and Lisp lore, and Forth lore etc... were all different, but they were all together, too.

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    Anmol Sahoo

    Anmol Sahoo - GADT's in OCaml

    schedule  02:00 - 03:30 PM place Ball Room 2

    OCaml is a multi-paradigm programming language with a pragmatic mix of functional and imperative programming features. OCaml, which has been around since 1996, has grown to be a battle tested language, widely deployed and used in production systems. In this talk, we will look at the support for Generalized Algebraic Data Types (GADTs), a powerful generalization of the more mundane Algebraic Data Types (ADTs). We will start with an example of building an interpreter for a small language and add type safety through GADTs. We will then look at a few powerful type-safe design patterns that GADTs enable.

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    Anupam Jain

    Anupam Jain - Supercharged Web Application development with Purescript

    schedule  02:00 - 02:45 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 1 Interested

    Purescript is a purely functional, strongly typed language, that compiles to Javascript.

    It provides several high quality libraries for frontend development, and comes with excellent tooling and editor support that makes writing code a snap!

    In this talk I will provide a quick introduction to some basics of Purescript, and then dive into an interactive demonstration of building a non-trivial web application from scratch. I will show how to interface with React bindings, and how to interface with some existing Javascript libraries (a React UI component lib).

    The presentation will be interactive and similar to an inpromptu talk I gave which is linked below. However, I will also demonstrate live coding of an actual purescript application which people can follow along.

    Bring your laptop to follow along.

03:00
03:30

    Coffee/Tea Break - 30 mins

04:00
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    Harendra Kumar

    Harendra Kumar - Streamly: Declarative Concurrency and Dataflow Programming in Haskell

    schedule  04:00 - 04:45 PM place Ball Room 1 people 4 Interested

    Overview: Streamly is a Haskell library for writing programs in a high level, declarative data flow programming paradigm. It provides a simple API, very close to standard Haskell lists. A program is expressed as a composition of data processing pipes, generally known as streams. Streams can be generated, merged, chained, mapped, zipped, and consumed concurrently – enabling a high level, declarative yet concurrent composition of programs. Programs can be concurrent or non-concurrent without any significant change. Concurrency is auto scaled based on consumption rate. Programmers do not have to be aware of threads, locking or synchronization to write scalable concurrent programs. Streamly provides C like performance, orders of magnitude better compared to existing streaming libraries.

    Motivation: Haskell has a beautiful abstraction capability. Haskell lists, several streaming and concurrency libraries are some examples of good programming abstractions. The problem is that concurrency is not handled elegantly and declaratively by these libraries. Moreover, the lack of good performance gives rise to special purpose performance centric libraries like text and bytestring creating more confusion. Streamly unifies, lists, streaming, concurrency, logic programming and reactive programming with unparalleled performance. We can finally have a unified string handling.

    Audience: Streamly is designed to express the full spectrum of programs. Do not think that if you are writing a small and simple program it may not be for you. It expresses a small program with the same efficiency, simplicity and elegance as a large scale concurrent application. It unifies many different aspects of special purpose libraries into a single yet simple framework. It is especially suitable for high performance and scalable backend data processing systems. If you use or plan to use any real time streaming or data flow programming frameworks including Apache Flink, Apache Spark or asynchronous/reactive programming frameworks like ReactiveX/RxJs then you may be interested in Streamly.

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    Saurabh Nanda

    Saurabh Nanda - Getting property-based testing to work after struggling for 3 years

    schedule  04:00 - 04:45 PM place Ball Room 2 people 1 Interested

    I got excited about property-based testing after hearing John Hughes talk at Functional Conf 2016. I tried it that year with QuickCheck, but failed miserably (it almost derailed the entire project delivery). I cribbed about it in my talk at Functional Conf 2017. In 2018, Srihari's talk got me excited again. This time, I tried with Hedgehog, and got it to work!

    This talk is about this journey and its learnings. We'll talk about how Hedgehog was used to test [1]:

    • A Postgres backed task/job queue
    • A small Wai/Servant based webapp

    And no, we will not talk about the most common (and completely useless) example of reversing a list!

    [1] Both of these are part of an open-sourced task/job queue library.

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    Deepak K [Daksh] Gupta

    Deepak K [Daksh] Gupta - Lambdas: The Functional Programming Companion of Modern C++

    schedule  04:00 - 04:45 PM place Meeting Room 1

    C++ as a Programming Languages had ruled the programming world for quite some time. It was so much synonymous to Object Oriented Programming that when functional programming came into the picture, nobody initially thought of C++ as a candidate for the same.

    Fortunately, the C++ Standardization (isocpp.org) committee had a different idea and they later came up with C++11 which was a paradigm shift in the language. C++ now not only allows programmers to write functional code, but it has also evolved the language into a meta programming language.

    The core of these changes which enables functional programming in C++ revolves around the introduction of Lambdas. Suddenly, with lambdas, we’re not only writing functional code in C++ but can also have functional threads, functional locks, and functional memory management.

    The beauty of lambdas can also be judged from the fact that it has also made many of the STL (Standard Template Library) algorithms functional which, along with the concepts and ideas of Closures makes C++ an ideal candidate to be considered for writing functional codes which includes immutability, Partial function specialization, and pattern matching.

    In this talk, I’ll take you on the journey of functional Programming in modern C++ and how to write awesome and simple C++ code which conforms to all tenets of Functional Programming.

    The talk shall contain full fledged examples which shall be made available to participants post conference

    We’ll also see how the language has evolved and why it’s still a favorite for doing performance intensive jobs which we can, of course, do in a functional way

05:00
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    Aaron W Hsu

    Aaron W Hsu - Programming Obesity: A Code Health Epidemic

    schedule  05:00 - 05:45 PM place Ball Room people 2 Interested

    Programs are getting fat. They're becoming slow. They're taking up more computing resources. They're getting harder to maintain and more complex from the ground up. Layer upon layer of sophistication is causing us to lose our ability to predict what software will do. Where's that bug? Why is everything going so slowly? Am I even using the right data structures? Where's that important point in the documentation again?

    What's happened to us? In this meta-dive into the nature of our approach to programming, we will explore some of the dangers of our current approaches to programming and the how/why of our current programming obesity problem. We will look at real case studies and see just how bad the situation can be.

    But we will also explore how we can battle these sources of obesity. In this passionate plea for code that we can gain control over again, we will look at examples of how we can return to a state of high-performance on all levels, from code size to code scalability. We will look at the principles that can help us to reach leaner, more efficient, more usable, less buggy code. We will hopefully find some light at the end of the tunnel, and how we can change our outlook on programming to push ourselves towards code that benefits not only ourselves, but also those that will come after us.

05:45

    Closing Talk - 15 mins

Mastering FP

Sat, Nov 16
09:00

    Registration - 30 mins

09:30
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    Bruce Tate

    Bruce Tate - Joy - Maintaining Passion for Programming

    schedule  09:30 - 10:15 AM place Ball Room people 4 Interested

    Many people in our industry are programmers because we're curious and passionate about coding. Each of us can remember latching onto a trivial programming problem and staying with it deep into the night. For far too many of us, that passion for programming fades under the slow, wilting heat of the day to day grind.

    In this talk, Bruce Tate, author of Seven Languages in Seven Weeks, takes a frank look at the grind and offers some practical advice on putting the "fun" back into "functions". We'll introduce some pragmatic ideas to get you excited about the journey again. We can't always dramatically change our circumstances, but we can often make small tweaks to how we approach problems.

    Come along. Enjoy the journey.

10:15

    Welcome Address & Mastering FP Day Overview - 15 mins

10:30

    Coffee/Tea Break - 30 mins

11:00
  • schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Ball Room 1 people 1 Interested

    There are a lot of algorithms that revolve around iterating a form of information propagation until it attains a deterministic fixed point. CRDTs, Datalog, SAT solving, functional reactive programming, and constraint programming all fit into this mold.

    One framework for these sorts of algorithms is the notion of a “propagator” due to Sussman and Radul, but until now little rigor has applied to know how such algorithms terminate with consistent results. Another framework is Lindsey Kuper’s work on the notion of “lattice variables” (LVars), which addresses termination, parallelism and eventual consistency well, but not iteration.

    By blending these frameworks, I’ll build up a series of sufficient conditions for propagators to terminate with consistent results and proceed to show how we can use this common framework to steal insights and quirks from each individual domain to try to optimize the rest.

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    Aaron W Hsu

    Aaron W Hsu - APL Training Wheels

    schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Ball Room 2 people 1 Interested

    APL is getting a lot of attention lately due to its potential for very high performance portability and suitability for both rapid prototyping of complex solutions as well as deployment of complex algorithms to high-speed, modern parallel hardware. It has the potential to vastly improve the speed, scalability, and size of your code bases. But APL has a reputation as an intimidating language to learn.

    In this back to the basics tutorial, we will explore the core of APL, and focus on those areas that usually trip up the beginner in learning APL. We will also walk you through how to approach an APL expression, how to reason about them, and how to read them efficiently. We will teach you the skills that the expert APLer has internalized, and how you can work through these skills externally and explicitly in a way that will help you to eventually internalize these critical skills in a way that makes you efficient at using APL on real world problems.

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    Saurabh Nanda

    Saurabh Nanda - Why is Haskell so hard to learn? (and how to deal with it)

    schedule  11:00 - 11:45 AM place Meeting Room 1 people 2 Interested

    Haskell is notoriously hard to learn. I have struggled with the learning curve. I have seen others struggle with it. And I have seen developers struggling to wield the language effectively even after months of learning.

    We'll talk about five things that give Haskell this (understandably) bad rep, and how to effectively deal with them during your learning phase.

12:00
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    Tony Morris

    Tony Morris - Zippers

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Ball Room 1 people 3 Interested

    The term zipper is a colloquial used to describe n-hole (most often, 1-hole) contexts. That is, a data structure that has a _hole_ or _pointer_ focused on a specific element with the ability to efficiently traverse to its neighbouring elements, providing an elegant solution for the need to efficiently traverse and _modify_ immutable data structures.

    In this talk, we will look at examples of zippers for canonical data structures such as lists and other products and sums. We will then define comonads and see the relationship between zippers and comonads.

    Most of this talk will be spent on the practical application of zippers in everyday programming. We will solve some simple problems using zippers. We will then contrast why we might use a zipper, compared to a lens.

    Finally, for a fun and interesting observation, we will look at the algebraic structure of products and sums, then compute the derivative of these structures. Turns out, a derivative of a data structure is its zipper ("McBride, Conor, et al (2005). ∂ for Data: Differentiating Data Structures").

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    Marshall Lochbaum

    Marshall Lochbaum - Thinking with Arrays

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Ball Room 2 people 1 Interested

    Building on Aaron's introduction to APL, Marshall will take a broader view of APL and discuss what the concept of a (multidimensional) array means to array programmers and why we might want to base entire languages on this concept. He will show how methods from the array paradigm can be used even when programming in functional languages, focusing on one APL operator rarely appreciated outside of the array community: the outer product. Finally he will discuss a number of problems taken from mathematics and practical programming and show how APL thinking can simplify and unify concepts: all of the problems are solved using the same simple pattern involving outer products!

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    Suvrat Apte

    Suvrat Apte - How debuggers work in Lispy languages

    schedule  12:00 - 12:45 PM place Meeting Room 1

    Debuggers are one of the most essential tools for any kind of development.

    Debuggers in Lispy languages make use of Lisp's homoiconicity. They are a bit different from debuggers for languages like C or Java.

    This kind of information is usually not needed in day to day development and hence it remains hidden.

    In this talk, I will take Clojure's cider-debug as an example and explain how it uses homoiconicity. Along with cider-debug, I will also talk about REPLs and how REPL client-server communication happens (with nREPL as an example).

12:45

    Lunch Break - 75 mins

02:00
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    Alexander Granin

    Alexander Granin - Hierarchical Free Monads and Software Design in Functional Programming

    schedule  02:00 - 02:45 PM place Ball Room 1 people 3 Interested

    Functional Programming is going through the same process of rethinking as Object Oriented Programming has passed already. FP today is not only something mystical, something barely applicable for day-to-day tasks, but rather a whole philosophy of building big, complex applications, with own tools, approaches and methodologies. We can see a lot of ideas about software design and architecture emerging from the FP community: talks, books, articles. We’re actively discussing Final Tagless, Free Monads, effect systems and other approaches, but it seems the theme not yet covered and we don’t know about possibilities we have.

    In this talk, I’ll tell you about the power of Free Monads in building complex applications in Haskell and PureScript. These applications will be satisfying the requirements like maintainability, testability, simplicity. You’ll know how to create a safe concurrent application state, how to divide the application into layers and how to keep the code sane. In fact, you can do the same with Final Tagless or extensible effects, but the approach with hierarchical Free Monads has some specific properties making it the best tool to separate concerns and create a very interesting eDSLs with different semantics.

    The talk is based on the ideas I’m describing in my book “Functional Design and Architecture”. I also gave several talks about this theme earlier (you can find all my talks here).

    I’ve used these ideas to build software for different companies, including Juspay (Bengaluru), Restaumatic (Poland), Enecuum (Hong Kong). We’ve created several interesting technologies that were not possible to make without Free Monads. Some of them are open sourced.

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    Morten Kromberg

    Morten Kromberg - Delivering your APLs

    schedule  02:00 - 02:45 PM place Ball Room 2

    Most talks on APL at FunctionalConf have focused on the way array oriented programming allows you to quickly deliver concise and efficient solutions to problems with an analytical core. This talk will focus on the development environment, and follow the life of an APL code snippet from it's interactive discovery, via testing and debugging, through to delivery as a web service and a shared object, embedded into a solution implemented in Python.

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    Adam Granicz

    Adam Granicz - Building a blog engine in F# with WebSharper

    schedule  02:00 - 03:30 PM place Meeting Room 1

    When it comes to developers blogging, expectations are high and many find that it’s a worthwhile effort to develop simple scripts, tools and even full engines to enhance and support blogging about their favorite language. In this hands-on session, you will implement your own blog engine from scratch in just a few hundred lines of F# code using WebSharper, and use its static file generation capabilities to generate blog pages that you can deploy directly into GitHub Pages or host in any web server. The resulting blog can easily be styled using WebSharper’s powerful templating capabilities, and even automated to rebuild when you commit new content or blog articles in your blog repository. You will also learn about adding dynamic functionality to your generated blog pages, or even turning your blog engine to a hosted solution that provides further capabilities as well. No more searching for blog engines with the right features, code what you need and enjoy!

03:00
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    Andrea Leopardi

    Andrea Leopardi - Papers We Love - Elixir Edition

    schedule  03:00 - 03:20 PM place Ball Room 1 people 1 Interested

    Elixir is a modern programming language built for concurrency, robustness, and maintainability. Although the Elixir team comes from “industry” backgrounds, the history of Elixir is full of cases where the team has reached for existing research in order to solve problems arising with the language. For example, we based our implementation of a code formatter on a series of papers on pretty printing and formatting code. In this talk, I’d like to go share our learnings and experiences as a bunch of industry folks getting help from academia to approach and tackle real-world problems and come up with real-world solutions.

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    Siddharth Bhat

    Siddharth Bhat - Monad-bayes: Probabilistic programming in haskell, tutorial & implementation

    schedule  03:00 - 03:20 PM place Ball Room 2 people 1 Interested

    We take a dive into probabilistic programming, beginning with a high-level explanation of what probabilistic programming is. We then continue to see how to use the monad-bayes library for performing tasks such as regression in a bayesian formalism. We also look into the implementation of the library, which involves performing an interesting sampling method (markov-chain-monte-carlo) on a very unique space (the space of computational traces of the program). We finally end with next-steps for the haskell community to improve in the probablistic programming space, ala pyro for python

    Here is our tiny re-implementation of monad-bayes, boiled down to the essentials: https://github.com/bollu/shakuni

    Paper on which the talk is based on: http://mlg.eng.cam.ac.uk/pub/pdf/SciGhaGor15.pdf

03:30

    Coffee/Tea Break - 30 mins

04:00
05:00

    Closing Panel - 45 mins

05:45

    Closing Talk - 15 mins

Post-Conf Workshop

Sun, Nov 17
09:30

    Registration - 30 mins

10:00
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    Edward Kmett

    Edward Kmett / Tony Morris - Let's Lens

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place Meeting Room 1 people 14 Interested

    Let's Lens presents a series of exercises, in a similar format to the Data61 functional programming course material. The subject of the exercises is around the concept of lenses, initially proposed by Foster et al., to solve the view-update problem of relational databases.

    The theories around lenses have been advanced significantly in recent years, resulting in a library, implemented in Haskell, called lens.

    This workshop will take you through the basic definition of the lens data structure and its related structures such as traversals and prisms. Following this we implement some of the low-level lens library, then go on to discuss and solve a practical problem that uses all of these structures.

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    Andrea Leopardi

    Andrea Leopardi - Building a real-time, reliable, resilient web application in one day with Elixir and Phoenix

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place Meeting Room 2 people 5 Interested

    We'll explore how to built connected, real-time web applications using Elixir and the Phoenix framework.

    • Look at the basics of Elixir, or rather the things we need to dive into the workshop
    • Get started with the basics of Phoenix and how to build simple HTML web applications with it
    • Introduce channels and learn how to use them in order to communicate with clients in real time
    • Talk about distribution and how to work with Phoenix on multiple servers
    • Talk about LiveView and learn how to update data on a page from the server without any JavaScript

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    Aaron W Hsu

    Aaron W Hsu / Morten Kromberg - APL Workshop Intensive

    schedule  10:00 AM - 06:00 PM place PRD Boardroom people 2 Interested

    This is an intensive workshop for those who are interested in learning how to think, read, and write APL. It will help give you the tools, mental framework, and structure for doing things "the APL way." In this workshop, you will have the chance to spend intensive time thinking like an APL programmer. What makes it different? How does the code look at the end? What thought process do you go through to get there? Get a chance to play around with a wide array of problems and solving them "the APL way."

    Taijiquan Classics say, "Four ounces deflects a thousand pounds."

    APLers might say instead, "Fifty characters solve a thousand problems."