A case study in scaled and self-organized Scrum

A green fields development project presented a good opportunity to experiment with an agile way of work involving increased team self-organization. Initially this involved confronting a traditional command-and-control approach with something based more closely on the Scrum Guide, while surmounting a number of impediments that are common to many organizations. Over time, as the project grew, scaling problems were discovered and had to be dealt with, ranging from simple things like meetings to more complex issues like team composition.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The session will be a talk with slides and an opportunity for Q&A.

Learning Outcome

As a case study, the attempt is not to show a "right way" to do things, but rather the way we actually did things and what we learned as a result. Participants are likely to achieve their learning outcome indirectly, by contrasting the information with their own personal experiences. A few points I will touch on:

  • Experiments we tried; what worked, what didn't.
  • Things we never got good at.
  • Balancing idealism vs. pragmatism.
  • Self-organization at the right pace.

Target Audience

Any Agile practitioner, but Scrum Masters will find the issues the most interesting.

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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