Final Conference Schedule is now live!

Open Web Conf

Thu, Jul 23
08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
10:00

    Welcome Talk by Naresh Jain - 15 mins

10:15

    Tea/Coffee Break - 15 mins

10:30
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    John K. Paul

    John K. Paul - ES6 Right Now

    schedule  10:30 AM - 12:00 PM place Grand Ballroom

    The list of solidified ES6 has kept growing and we, on the client side, just get greener with envy. Many of these new features won’t be supported in a broad base of browsers for years to come, but there is hope for us nonetheless. While we don’t have the ease of flipping a command line flag, like node, to bask in the warm sunlight of ES6 sugar, we can build a system that gives us similar results.

    Using a combination of shims and transpilers, we can enjoy these new language features while still maintaining support for all of the browsers you’d need. I'll first explain some of the great new additions to the JavaScript programming language and example use cases with code that take advantage of ES6's elegance for client side development. I will go through the details of setting up a development environment with source maps for debugging the code that you wrote, rather than what is generated by a transpiler.

    After listening to this talk, I hope your jealousy will be soothed, and I know that your curiosity will be satisfied.

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    Shashi Gowda

    Shashi Gowda - What can you do with Virtual DOM on the server?

    schedule  10:30 - 11:15 AM place ESquire Hall
    Facebook's React pioneered the idea of the Virtual DOM - a clever trick which resulted in a framework that supports a declarative programming style, allows pleasant modularity, and surprising efficiency. This talk will explore the ability to represent a web application as the Virtual DOM on the server side. The Escher.jl Julia package is attempt to implement these ideas. Escher introduces two twists in the usual Virtual DOM story:
     
    1. Extend the Virtual DOM idea to HTML5 Custom Elements. In Escher, things like event listeners, entities that send messages over web sockets are custom elements. You can attach these to other elements to make them behave in interesting ways. Escher also comes out-of-the box with a rich library of pure functions that result in DOM nodes. These DOM nodes address various needs: Markdown, Vector Graphics (via Compose), Plots (via Gadfly), LaTeX, Layouts, Typography, Styles, Input Widgets, Clickable and Keyboard behaviors, even pages, tabs, menus, slideshows are all supported out-of-the box. This is done using Escher's custom elements (mostly the bits that support FRP) and the Polymer library (everything else, pretty much).  This library is entirely functional, and deals only with immutable values.
     
    2. Represent DOM on the server side: The Patchwork.jl package provides the ability to represent DOM on the server. It is essentially a mirror of a VDom node in virtual-dom - a pure JavaScript Virtual DOM library by Matt Esch. Escher sends the browser a JSON formatted Virtual DOM, and subsequently, sequences of patches sent as the UI needs to change.
     
    Escher works seamlessly with Reactive.jl - an FRP library derived from the Elm language's Signal library written for Julia. The result is a strangely beautiful pure Julia web programming experience which lets you do beautiful and bold visualizations of data, write interactive / explorable explanations, and teach better.
11:30
12:15

    Lunch - 75 mins

01:30
02:30
03:15

    Tea/Coffee Break - 15 mins

03:30
03:55
04:15

    Break - 15 mins

04:30
05:30

    Closing Talk - 30 mins

jQuery Conf 2015 Day 1

Fri, Jul 24
08:30

    Registration - 30 mins

09:00
10:00

    Welcome Talk by Naresh Jain - 15 mins

10:15

    Tea/Coffee Break - 15 mins

10:30
11:00
  • schedule  11:00 AM - 12:30 PM place Grand Ballroom

    Over the past decade, eXtreme Programming practices like Test-Driven Development (TDD), Behavior Driven Developer (BDD), Refactoring and Continuous Integration have fundamentally changed software development processes and inherently how engineers work. Practitioners claim that it has helped them significantly improve their development speed, design quality and responsiveness to changing requirements. Software professionals across the board, from Internet startups to medical device companies to space research organizations, today have embraced these practices. But can these practices be applied to front-end development? Especially jQuery plugin development?

    This demo will show how we can test drive a jQuery plugin with the help of various patterns, strategies, tools and techniques. Participants will understand how they can apply this approach for testing any jQuery code.

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    Charanjit Singh

    Charanjit Singh - Going framework-less with virtual-dom and FRP (RxJS)

    schedule  11:00 AM - 12:30 PM place ESquire Hall

    Functional Reactive Programming is a slightly different take towards asynchronous programming which helps creating simple and powerful software with good architecture. FRP reduces the complexity of a asynchronous code by providing a unifying concept to cover most things asynchronous, and the result is a easy to build and easy to maintain architecture. Reactive programming is a powerful concept, Meteor is a living proof of that. FRP is another, more advanced (imho) flavour of reactive programming.

    This session we'll create a simple app called YARR (Yet Another RSS Reader), using virtual-DOM and RxJS without using any front-end or isomorphic javascript framework. We're going framework-less for this session so we could concentrate only on FRP concepts which might be little hard to grasp for those who do little Functional Programming (sadly, most of Js devs). This session will demonstrate how FRP leads to a saner architecture for apps without relying on a framework for forcing your hand to do so. 

12:30

    Lunch - 60 mins

01:30
02:15

    Hackathon Launch - 15 mins

02:45
03:10

    Tea/Coffee Break - 20 mins

03:30
04:30
05:15

    Networking/Dinner & Hackathon - 285 mins

jQuery Conf 2015 Day 2

Sat, Jul 25
09:00
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    Dave Methvin

    Dave Methvin - Don't Make These jQuery Mistakes

    schedule  09:00 - 10:00 AM place Grand Ballroom

    You can find solutions to thousands of jQuery problems on the Internet in blog posts, StackOverflow answers, or on Github. The problem is, many of those answers and code snippets are very obsolete! The web development world of 2006 that jQuery was born into is very different than the world of 2015, and jQuery has evolved to keep up. Yet there are still features inside of jQuery that only remain because of compatibility concerns, not because they're a good idea in modern web development.

    This talk will discuss features of jQuery that are best to avoid if you want a fast web site or HTML app that works with the widest range of browsers--even browsers that haven't yet been released! You'll also learn how using some of these features can make it very hard to follow modern practices such as Responsive Design. For each feature, you'll learn the modern 2015 way to do each of these tasks.

10:00

    Important Announcements by Naresh Jain - 15 mins

10:15

    Tea/Coffee Break - 15 mins

10:30
11:30
12:15

    Lunch - 75 mins

01:30
02:15

    Fishbowl - Future of JavaScript Frameworks - 45 mins

03:00

    Tea/Coffee Break - 30 mins

03:30
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    Eric Schoffstall

    Eric Schoffstall - Real World WebRTC

    schedule  03:30 - 04:30 PM place Grand Ballroom

    WebRTC provides APIs for webcam access and P2P video/voice/data that finally give us the power to create a new calibre of web applications. However, WebRTC is not a shining unicorn just yet - there are complications when it comes to browser support, supporting mobile devices, supporting networks that can't do P2P, and more that need to be overcome. In this talk I will show you how to create a real world, stable, and highly scalable WebRTC application as well as review some of the basics behind how WebRTC works under the hood.

    Included: fun demos, real production code, horror stories from our WebRTC company.

04:30

    Hackathon Demos - 60 mins

05:30

    Announce Hackathon Winners & Closing Talk - 30 mins