Organisational Resilience - Design your Organisation to Flourish NOT merely Survive

A resilient organizational can not only adapt and respond to incremental change but more importantly, can respond to sudden disruptions and also, be the source of disruption in order to prosper and flourish.

The traditional risk management approach focuses too much on defensive (stopping bad things happen) thinking versus a more progressive (making good things happen) thinking. Being defensive requires consistency across the organization and this is where methodologies like Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) come in. However, PDCA approach does not bake in the required progressive thinking and flexibility required for a fast company organization which operates in a volatile environment.

Professor David Denyer of Cranfield University has recently published a very interesting research report on Organizational Resilience. He has identified the following four quadrants across to help us think about organizational resilience:

  • preventative control (defensive consistency)
  • mindful action (defensive flexibility)
  • performance optimization (progressive consistency)
  • adaptive innovation (progressive flexibility)

In this talk, I'll share my personal experience of using this thinking to help an organization to scale their product to Millions of users. I've dive deep into how we structured our organization for Structural Agility and how we set-up a very lightweight governance model using OKRs to drive the necessary flexible and progressive thinking.

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Case Study

  • A quick overview of tension quadrant
    • preventative control (defensive consistency)
    • mindful action (defensive flexibility)
    • performance optimization (progressive consistency)
    • adaptive innovation (progressive flexibility)
  • Problems with the old organizational structure and why it was not resilient
  • How did we change the organizational structure and the challenges faced
  • Once we formed the new structure, how did we create a governance model that encouraged the right behavior of innovation and resilience

Learning Outcome

  • Understand the tension between defensive vs. progressive and consistency vs. flexibility to achieve Organizational Resilience
  • Understand why Plan-Do-Check-Act is not sufficient for Organizational Resilience
  • Understand why Structural Agility is important and how you can structure your organization to be more resilient
  • Understand how you can set-up a very lightweight governance model using OKRs to drive the necessary flexible and progressive thinking

Target Audience

Executives, Leaders, Change Agents

schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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