[WORKSHOP] Explore & live an intercultural encounter and learn some sociology on the way

The Derdians are a rural and peaceful people living in small huts nestled in lush green valleys. Previously renouncing any form of modernity, the Derdians decided this year to open up to the world and welcome new products from around the globe.

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Get ready for a clash of cultures!

"The Derdians" is a well-knowed workshop used by cultural hackers to make teams (or people) acknowledge their cultural differences, and find their way to a better communication/collaboration.

The participants of this workshop experiment (and therefore, discover) the gregarious reflexes that human groups have when they are in contact with a different culture. The participants leave the session with key levers to reduce the clash of cultures and to encourage collaboration of culturally-distant teams.

Facilitated by Romain Vailleux, this workshop begins with a role-playing game (hilarious and dynamic!), and ends with a debrief phase to compile the learning of the workshop as a take away.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Workshop

  1. Set the Scene : The Engineers must transfer a technology to the Derdians
  2. The Derdians and the Engineers prepare themselves to the encounter
  3. The Engineers send an emissary to check the details at the Derdians' place
  4. The Engineers and the Derdians collaborate to build something (an ethnological expedition observes the situation)
  5. Debrief: what do we learn from this situation? (the ethnological expedition make a report of the observations)

(I can't tell you more than that without spoiling the workshop, sorry! :)

Learning Outcome

The participants get out of this workshop with:

  • More knowledge about themselves when involved into a intercultural encounter
  • More knowledge about groups reactions and social behaviors when two teams that doesn't share the same culture have to collaborate
  • Some natural practices that groups implements to build a bridge over cultural gaps and how to encourage them
  • A faciliation guide to reproduce the workshop in their organizations

==> A deeper understanding of fundamental behaviors of human groups, applicable to worklife situations

Target Audience

Practitioners, change agents, managers

Prerequisites for Attendees

Participants should not have already played this workshop before.

schedule Submitted 3 months ago

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