The Good, Bad & Ugly: what we've learned in 10 years of scaling agile -- a panel discussion

Agile is now all grown up and is pretty much the de facto way of working for most teams, but it's proven to be a challenge for adoption at scale. Over the last ten years or so there has been a lot of trial and error figuring out how to break through the cultural barriers, political resistance and technical hurdles that large organisations present. This panel of luminaries (!) brings a wealth of experience helping many different types of organisations transform themselves to be fit for purpose in the 21st century. Come along to hear their stories, some good, some bad and probably a few ugly ones!

PLEASE NOTE: this session will be recorded live by The Weekly Reboot podcast and and made available for public consumption. Your attendance will be taken as acceptance to being recorded and publicly broadcast.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Panel

About 6 people with extensive experience across a wide range of industries with direct involvement in leading transformational programs. This will be a facilitated discussion that highlights the key challenges and lessons learned along the way, what works and doesn't work, and maybe even a bit of spicy disagreement! The audience will have the opportunity to engage with the panel members to ask questions and seek their views.

Learning Outcome

Practical insights about the actual challenges of adopting Agile at scale.

Target Audience

Those who are leading, participating or suffering the transformation of large scale organisations.

Prerequisites for Attendees

A basic understanding of Agile principles, approaches and intentions.

schedule Submitted 1 month ago

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