Avoid and Overcome Common PITFALL!s in Your Agile Transformation

schedule May 29th 10:30 - 11:30 AM place Capitol 2 & 3 people 72 Interested

Creating a sustainable transformation means more than most companies think. In this talk, we’ll review real-world examples and case studies of common transformation pitfalls, how to avoid them, and - most importantly - how to overcome them to get the treasure at the end, just like Pitfall Harry.

Creating a sustainable agile transformation is possible for every organization and company, but there are many pitfalls and obstacles. Some are obvious (not getting the right people to lead it) and some aren’t (does your performance review system support agile?). What matters is knowing what some of those pitfalls are, how to identify when you’ve come across one, and what you need to do to avoid or overcome it.

In my years of supporting and leading transformations, I’ve pretty much seen it all. From a VP of IT who wants to know “when we’ll be done with this agile thing” to a manager who still tries telling teams what to work on daily to executives who think that it’s just everyone else who needs to change. But it’s not just about seeing these problems - it’s about knowing how to mitigate or overcome them. How do you convince that executive that they’re going to have to make changes to support a sustainable transformation? How do you convince that manager to stop telling his people what to do? And how do you help that VP of IT understand that we won’t be “done” with agile - that this is the new way of working?

 
 

Outline/Structure of the Talk

Class structure:

  1. Introduction
  2. What is an agile transformation?
  3. The PITFALL!s
    • Poor agile practices
    • Managerial interference
    • HR
    • Finance
    • Legal
    • Executives
  4. Closing

While that may seem like a lot, I adjust the level of detail for some of these items based on the time available and which topics we cover based on the experience level of the attendees. I also encourage people to reach out for more detailed information. This lecture is part of a book I’m writing regarding sustainable transformations.

Learning Outcome

Attendees will leave with a deeper understanding of the kinds of common pitfalls I've encountered in my transformation efforts, what I've done to overcome or mitigate them, and how they can apply those techniques to their circumstances. They should understand what kinds of challenges exist and what they can do to go over, around, under, and through those pitfalls.

Transformations can be hard. And trying to coach different levels of an organization or a company compounds that difficulty. And not knowing the lingo and slang of a particular group (HR, Finance, Legal, etc) can exacerbate that even more. And feeling like you have no authority to be talking to these people tends to make it practically impossible.

In this talk, I encourage people to step outside their comfort zones. To challenge the status quo. To “be bold”, as Wikipedia puts it. And to give them understanding and knowledge about what some of these pitfalls are, how to avoid them (when possible), and how to overcome them when you encounter them. I use the Atari 2600 video game PITFALL! as the background for these conversations to make the talk engaging and entertaining as possible.

I’ve been working on enterprise agile transformations for many years and have learned many of these lessons the hard way. I hope that by providing the class with some context and visibility to the problems they’ll encounter - and strategies to move around, over, or through them - that they can experience the benefits that agile can provide in their companies.

Target Audience

Anyone who needs to engage other groups and management in an agile transformation.

Prerequisites for Attendees

Some understanding of basic agile principles and practices. An interest in transformation beyond a single team.

schedule Submitted 9 months ago

Public Feedback

comment Suggest improvements to the Speaker
  • Christen McLemore
    By Christen McLemore  ~  9 months ago
    reply Reply

    I like these aspects of the submission, and they should be retained:

    • topic is relevant to what our industry is struggling to solve
    • addressing a lot of ideas that have been discussed before

    I think the submission could be improved by:

    • the outline is sparse and needs more to show the committee how the session would flow
    • knowing the time box in advance, propose an a outline that helps us visualize the session
    • don't see anything that tells us what you're recommending
    • learning outcomes should provides a succinct list of objectives an attendee should come away with by the end of the session (lots of words currently that will be overlooked)