Movie making is a costly affair involves risks and uncertainties. An Agile approach of incremental moviemaking makes it more predictable and risk resilience.
Up to 20% of the overall Budget of the movie can be saved by effective use of Agile & Lean techniques.
Using Agile Practices in Movie making can take you to your destination in a systematic way.
Experimenting, Prototyping, Shared Learning & Using Effective Tools makes Movie making process fast, more predictable and cost effective. Prioritize scenes using “MoSCoW” technique to arrive at “Which scene to shoot Where & When”.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

Movie making is a costly affair involves risks and uncertainties. An Agile approach of incremental moviemaking makes it more predictable and risk resilience.
Up to 20% of the overall Budget of the movie can be saved by effective use of Agile & Lean techniques.
Using Agile Practices in Movie making can take you to your destination in a systematic way.

  1. Our aim is to satisfy audience through timely delivery of engaging & entertaining movies. And we welcome changes even late in development.
  2. The team (Cast & Crew) sharing responsibility for delivering the complete movie as per writer/director's vision.
  3. Experimenting, prototyping, shared learning & using effective tools to make moviemaking process faster, more predictable and cost effective.
  4. Focus on eliminating waste and wasteful activities in the entire value stream of moviemaking process.
  5. Continuous focus on technical excellence and use of advanced tools and techniques to enhance agility.

Learning Outcome

1.      How some of the Agile Like (similar to agile) best practices used in movie making for ages can be adopted in IT and vice versa.

2.      How Agile along with Six-Sigma Lean can act as a Power Pack for cost cutting as well as excellence in production execution in movie making.

3.      Importance of special Tools and Techniques in movie making as well as in IT wherever there is a technical challenge or a creative constraint.

4.      Agile Project Management vs. Film Project Management.

5.      Envisioning vs. Daily Scrum Meeting

6.      Post-mortem vs. Retrospective

7.      Film Budgeting vs. Agile Estimation

Target Audience

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schedule Submitted 1 year ago

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