Design Thinking for Organizational Change

We all know how people use design thinking to create better products and deliver delightful experiences to our users. However, design thinking can be an excellent tool to use for organizational change. In the case of organizational change, our product is the change that we are trying to drive, and our customers are those people who are impacted (internally and externally) and have to live with that change. In the same way that design thinking puts the user front-and-centre for products, it can be used to put people in the organization front-and-centre. In this talk we will discuss how design thinking works and, as a case study, how we have applied it at Scotiabank to help drive adoption of the Bank’s NPS customer insights into building solutions that serve our customers. In that program, previous internal processes were ineffective in pushing relevant data to delivery teams at the right time. Using a Lean or Agile approach would have provided some benefit, but taking a design thinking approach uncovered an array of useful insights to make the whole process more purposeful. Learn from this example to explore how you might incorporate design thinking to drive greater effectiveness and relevance for your team’s body of work.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Overview of what Design Thinking is
  2. How it’s traditionally used to build software
  3. Context of Scotiabank’s digital transformation
  4. Scotiabank's Customer experience & NPS approach
  5. Step-by-step process of design thinking was used in this case
  6. Interviews we did and insights we uncovered
  7. Benefits of the solution
  8. Broader applicability – how to take this example and apply it

Learning Outcome

People will learn what the Design Thinking process is and how to apply it in an organizational change context.

Target Audience

Organizational change agents, Leadership

Prerequisite

None

schedule Submitted 2 months ago

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