Things Are Broken: A Case Study In Moving Tooooooooo Fast

Speed.

It's been a driver in our industry before it was even an industry. The more Agile becomes more mainstream, the more we think it's part of the package. Books are out promising that certain frameworks can deliver twice as much in half the time. And yet, teams still struggle delivering what's expected of them.

Once I started asking people of all levels of leadership what they thought speed would give them, it allowed me to develop some experiments around those expectations.

Please join me for a case study where we discuss the need for speed, the origins of that desire, and the ways it manifests itself into deliverables. My desire is for the audience to take away some powerful learning into their places of work. Only by understanding the expectations around speed can we reset them into an environment built around trust and support for motivated individuals.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

This will mostly be an experience report of my first major change experiment and the learnings I took. There will be a few places where I stop to ask some thought provoking questions to make the material more personal to the audience. 

Outline:

  • Intro - 5 min
  • Speed is the name of the game - 5 min
  • The challenge presented as a change leader - 5 min
  • What was my plan? - 5 min
  • What were the problems I encountered along the way? - 10 min
  • How we pivoted as a group - 10 min
  • What did I learn? - 10 min
  • Q&A - 10 min

Learning Outcome

1. What does speed get us, really?

2. Is there a misunderstanding of speed?

3. Conversations of speed are really related to something deeper going on.

4. How can we change the conversation?

5. How to run build-measure-learn loops about speed on teams.

Target Audience

Anyone who's struggled with the speed of delivery being the most important part of Agile teams.

Prerequisite

Just a projector.

schedule Submitted 3 months ago

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