Dual Track Agile: Discovering and Delivering on Customer Needs Together

Agile teams today are made up of design, science, engineering, and product specialists who work together to understand customer needs and build products. When teams focus exclusively on building shippable code, discovery of customer needs tends to get overlooked. Losing sight of customer needs results in less desirable products and mediocre experiences.

How can teams continue to discover customer needs without sacrificing the quality of the software they ship? This is where Dual Track Agile (DTA) comes in.

In this talk we will share practical advice on how to accommodate discovery and learning with the help of DTA. We will explain how to set up DTA on a cross-functional team, feed discovery learnings into the development process, and end up with a better product that your customers will love!

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

  1. Current challenges in the Agile product development process.
  2. The role of discovery in product development process.
  3. Introduction to Dual Track Agile.
  4. How to apply DTA on cross-disciplinary teams to build better products.

Learning Outcome

Participants will learn about Dual Track Agile and gain some practical insights into applying Dual Track Agile to foster continuous team learning, transparency and customer focus.

Target Audience

Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, leaders and cross-functional team members interested in building better products through Agile collaboration.

Prerequisite

Having knowledge and previous experience product development with Agile methods, i.e. Scrum, would be nice to have but not required.

schedule Submitted 2 months ago

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