Don't hire more coaches, increase your coaching capacity!

Many organizations have difficulty hiring coaches to support their teams in applying agile principles and practices. As a result, many teams are left to their own devices and often face challenges that can lead to mediocre results and even demotivated teams, quite the opposite what the introduction of agile principles intended to achieve.

I believe that many organizations are trying to solve the wrong problem. It is not the lack of coaches on the market that is causing the lack of support for the teams, but the lack of coaching capacity. What if there are alternative ways to address this redefined problem besides only hiring more coaches?

I have helped small and large organizations increase their coaching capacity with programs that structure coaching for both the coaches and the teams. Join this session to hear about these experiences and understand how you as well can gradually increase the coaching capacity of your teams.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The participants will be guided through a facilitated workshop where they will brainstorm answers to short and focussed questions, gradually leading them to strategies to increase coaching capacity within organizations. Throughout, strategies that I applied in organizations will be discussed to validate the outcomes of the answers and point out the challenges with some.

  • What is coaching really?
  • What are the reasons that many teams lack the support they need?
  • Redefining the problem
  • Brainstorming aspects of the solution
  • Successful strategies
  • Examples from the industry

At the end of the workshop, I will wrap up elaborating a concrete successful strategy for a large multinational organization, receiving praise from the customer for the approach and outcomes.

Learning Outcome

Learn about the reasons why agile transformations achieve mediocre results

Understand the real problem with coaching teams

Learn strategies to address that problem

Learn about specific situations and organizations, the successes and the challenges with the suggested techniques

Target Audience

Coaches, Leaders, Decision Makers

Prerequisite

Participants should have a basic understanding of what coaching really is, what it is trying to achieve.

Participants should understand the basics of agile principles.

schedule Submitted 4 months ago

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