Why can't the business be agile too? How ADP is incorporating business Agile practices to keep up with technology

Does your business struggle to catch up and understand the technical deliverables from your Sprint Reviews? Is there unnecessary re-work and scope creep because requirements are not properly described by the business? ADP has sought to address these issues by incorporating business Agile practices to keep up with technology. The result? Clearer requirements, strong engagement during Sprint Reviews and a collaborative solution with business readiness aligning with technical deliverables. Join our session to find out more!!

 
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Outline/Structure of the Talk

40 minute session

Using a story telling format. The two presenters, Carlo Rosales, Product Owner IMMS and Johanne Boyd, Director Organization Enablement have been working to improve the experience and output by using Agile practices for both technology and business teams and wish to share their journey.

2 minutes - Introduction of Presenters

5 minutes - Background of what was not working – recounting real life scenarios

13 minutes - Review the principles of Business Agility – using slides to describe the stages of Business Agility

5 minutes - Changes to the Sprint Review – using slides to describe the governance and Sprint collateral

5 minutes - Success story from these change and summary of benefits

5 minutes - How we are continuing the transformation to provide Minimal Viable Solution MVS versus Minimal Viable

Product

5 minutes -Questions

Learning Outcome

Participants will learn about how business applies Agile practices - includes three distinct phases that the business follows in collaboration with technology to ensure alignment and preparedness before Sprint 0.

Target Audience

Partcipants who are involved in Product Management, Project Management and Sprint Development

Prerequisites for Attendees

No pre-requisite required

schedule Submitted 2 years ago

Public Feedback

comment Suggest improvements to the Speaker
  • Paul J. Heidema
    By Paul J. Heidema  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    I have seen Johanne and Carlo instill Agile thinking and approach to our business partners at ADP. This is a story worth telling and hearing. I look forward to learning from them at the conference.

    • Johanne Boyd
      By Johanne Boyd  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Paul, as our Agile Coach, you have helped Carlo and I with your insight and appreciate your support.

  • Temsila Malik
    By Temsila Malik  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    Another great session to attend and learn from the experiences.

    • Johanne Boyd
      By Johanne Boyd  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thank you Temsila and I know the Scrum team have benefitted with the business following Agile practices as well  

  • Bart Kozakiewicz
    By Bart Kozakiewicz  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    Seeing Johanne driving the agility for business mindset and process has been invigorating. Looking forward to gaining further insight to the  experience thus far and the benefits that the process has brought to the business.

    • Johanne Boyd
      By Johanne Boyd  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Bart you were instrumental in providing the framework for our business Agile practices and have been happy to execute to improve the collaboration with technology.

  • Debopriya
    By Debopriya  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    I'm sure it would be a great presentation ; All the Best !!

    • Johanne Boyd
      By Johanne Boyd  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thank you Debo, I look forward to sharing what has worked at ADP with other businesses

  • Naeem Ibrahim
    By Naeem Ibrahim  ~  2 years ago
    reply Reply

    I am looking forward to this presentation!

    • Johanne Boyd
      By Johanne Boyd  ~  2 years ago
      reply Reply

      Thank you for your support Naeem.


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    Description:

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    Talk
    Beginner

    When Agile first came on the scene it was premised around putting the customer first. But, over the years its focus has evolved and the general perception of Agile today is that it’s mostly a tool for delivering software. Agile’s original focus was mainly on developers and testers, but it never really contemplated design thinking as a discipline. Design thinking, which has been around for decades but is only recently having its ‘moment in the sun’, compliments agile beautifully in that it focuses on trying to solve the right problems for the right people. Design thinking allows us to iterate and test assumptions before too much coding and production-readiness is done, which helps ensure the team is investing in the right things at every stage. It really provides a focus on innovating rather than simply burning down a backlog. In this talk we will discuss different ways to incorporate design thinking into the agile process. You will learn how to yield benefits from bringing these two practices together – most importantly how to best serve the users of the product or service you are delivering. At Scotiabank, we’ve been using these fantastic tools in combination for over a year. It is a journey, and although we haven’t completely solved everything yet, there are a lot of lessons we have learned that can be applied elsewhere.

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    Tyler Motherwell - Divide And Conquer

    Tyler Motherwell
    Tyler Motherwell
    Sr. Coach
    Agile by Design Inc.
    schedule 2 years ago
    Sold Out!
    40 Mins
    Experience Report
    Intermediate

    Conway’s Law tells us that the products an organization produces will mirror the communication structures within themselves. Many organizations struggle to organize in a way that facilitates both agility and bringing quality products to market. However, this is a problem that exists, not just within IT, but across the entire enterprise. Imagine you’re the (somewhat mythical/revered) business. How do you organize yourselves in this brave new world? Many of the common patterns (systems, application/application layer) that we commonly apply in technology aren’t good fits.

    In this session, you will learn how to use a structured method to organize your most important resource (your people) around your most important goals. Additionally, you will learn about team types outside of your typical cross-functional team! We will use an actual industry case study to help illustrate usage, as well as give inspiration to how you might do the same in your organization