How to Lose Dev and Alienate Ops

As many organizations have adopted agile development and are starting to undertake a DevOps transformation to complete the lifecycle, it is not always easy to keep traditionally alienated back office practitioners engaged. In fact, many organizations go about engaging developers, testers, operators, ... in a way that does not align with the spirit of DevOps. Many enterprise DevOps transformations fail because of this very reason, this session will inform the audience of what it takes to create a strong and sustainable movement within an IT organization in today's world where people who perform different functions that are seemingly at odds can come together in the spirit of improving how work is done and delivered.

The speaker will approach the topic from an anti-patterns perspective, highlighting the symptoms of transformation failure from structural, procedural, and strategic angles and discussing alternative approaches to enable DevOps transformation success.

 
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Outline/structure of the Session

The structure of the talk will be as follows:

1- Walking the audience through a sample typical dysfunctional organizational setup/ practices (that arguably many organizations have today) and possible outcomes

2- Dissecting the above setup into a set of (anti)patterns and walking through each of these patterns, explaining how they contradict the spirit of DevOps, the negative outcome they usually result in, and what to do about it instead. Some of the anti-patterns that will be discussed include:

  • Using DevOps as a cost-cutting initiative where the org can afford to do double the work for half the cost
  • Creating a permanent state DevOps team that lives alongside all the traditional teams that existed in the org
  • Vendor-driven transformation where the org's staff have no say in shaping their own destiny

Learning Outcome

The learning outcome from this talk would be an understanding of common organizational DevOps anti-patterns that lead to alienation of the very people DevOps is supposed to be enabled by. The idea is for attendees to clearly recognize these anti-patterns, be able to avoid them, and be enabled to proactively do the groundwork needed to make DevOps as much a cultural transformation of day-to-day work as it as a technology transformation.

Target Audience

Team Leaders, Agile/ DevOps CoE Members, Developers, Testers, Operators

Prerequisite

Have a basic understanding of what DevOps is about.

schedule Submitted 1 week ago

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