YOW! 2017 Sydney Pre-Conference Workshop Day 1

Tue, Dec 5
Timezone: Australia/Sydney (AEST)
08:30

    YOW! 2017 Workshop Registration - 30 mins

09:00

YOW! 2017 Sydney Pre-Conference Workshop Day 2

Wed, Dec 6
Timezone: Australia/Sydney (AEST)
08:30

    YOW! 2017 Workshop Registration - 30 mins

09:00
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    Jeff Patton

    Jeff Patton - Passionate Product Ownership: A Certified Scrum Product Ownership Workshop ...continued

    schedule  09:00 AM - 05:00 PM place Cliftons Sydney people 12 Interested shopping_cart Reserve Seat star_halfRate

    Product Ownership is hard! If you’re working as a product owner in an Agile team, you already know this is the toughest and most critical role in a successful product organization. If you’re a UX practitioner, senior engineer, or marketing professional in your organization, it may seem like adopting Scrum or Agile development has stripped away your ability to contribute as a product decision maker.

    If you’re adopting an Agile approach, your organization may be struggling with bloated backlogs that aren’t well understood, stressful planning meetings that last too long and fail to get at details needed to deliver predictably, a nagging feeling that you’re building the wrong thing, a lack of time to work with customers and users, chronically late delivery, and frustrated business stakeholders...There’s hope!

    The Passionate Product Ownership workshop takes on the bad assumptions and bad practices that often emerge from overly simplistic approaches to agile development and Scrum. Jeff Patton will leverage his past product leadership experience, and years of coaching product teams to teach an effective product ownership strategy.

    RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

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    Joshua Kerievsky

    Joshua Kerievsky - Modern Agile Workshop

    schedule  09:00 AM - 05:00 PM place Cliftons Sydney 2 shopping_cart Reserve Seat star_halfRate

    Much has changed since the publishing of the Agile Manifesto in 2001.

    Pioneers and practitioners of lean and agile methods have examined weaknesses and friction points, experimented with simpler approaches, and produced agile processes that are safer, simpler and far more capital efficient. The result is modern agile. It’s values-driven, non-prescriptive and an easier starting point than antiquated agile processes. Modern agile amplifies the values and practices of organizations that have discovered better ways of achieving awesome outcomes. Are you still cramming low-quality work in the end of each sprint, struggling with growing technical debt, guessing about requirements, focusing on output over outcomes.

    RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

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    Mike Amundsen

    Mike Amundsen - Building Adaptable Web API Clients from the Ground Up

    schedule  09:00 AM - 05:00 PM place Cliftons Sydney 3 shopping_cart Reserve Seat star_halfRate

    In a series of simple review and refactoring, you’ll learn how to move specific knowledge of 1) addresses, 2) inputs, and 3) workflow out of the client app and place it into the messages passed between servers and clients. As a result, you’ll have a more robust, adaptable, and resilient client that will reduce the need to versioning and repeated redeployment.

    Based on Amundsen's 2017 book "RESTful Web Clients", workshop attendees will use HTML, Javascript, and CSS to create simple, adaptable browser-based client apps that can "talk" to compatible servers, even ones that client app never "met" before.

    This session offers valuable lessons and advice for front end developers, API service providers, and software architects.

    RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

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    Gregor Hohpe

    Gregor Hohpe - Architecting Enterprise Transformation 37 Things One Architect Knows

    schedule  09:00 AM - 05:00 PM place Cliftons Sydney 4 shopping_cart Reserve Seat star_halfRate

    Many large enterprises are under pressure to transform their IT architecture and organization, as their business is attacked by “digital disruptors”. IT architects can play a key role in such a transformation because they combine the technical, communication, and organizational skill to apply IT for the benefit of the business. Their job is not an easy one, though: they must maneuver in an organization where IT is often still seen as a cost center, where operations means “run” as opposed to “change”, and where middle-management has become cozy neither understanding the business strategy nor the underlying technology.

    This workshop illustrates how software or IT architects can play an active role in driving the digital transformation of a large enterprise. To do so, they need to extend their horizon beyond dealing with technology to navigate organizational politics, get management attention, work with external vendors, and pick the right battles. The examples and anecdotes originate from the presenter’s experience as Chief Architect in a large financial services organization that is undergoing a massive IT transformation.

    RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

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    Dave Farley

    Dave Farley - Continuous Delivery

    schedule  09:00 AM - 05:00 PM place Cliftons Sydney 5 people 269 Interested shopping_cart Reserve Seat star_halfRate

    Continuous Delivery is a complex, holistic approach to software development and has a significant impact on the way in which organisations operate. This approach demands a broad range of skills and techniques.

    This course is designed to introduce, and explore a deeper understanding of, these ideas and techniques. It is primarily aimed at “Change Agents” within organisations, Leaders, Lead Developers, Lead Architects and so on.

    More specifically this course will give you the tools to help your company become a 'Learning Organisation'. Increase efficiency and quality, and reduce risk in your software development process. Our training can teach the techniques that will allow you to increase user satisfaction and make your organisation more innovative.

    We do this by teaching an approach that will allow your company to become more experimental and capable of reacting quickly and efficiently to change and allowing your software development process to become a tool that enables this flexibility rather than an impediment to it.

    RESERVE YOUR SEAT NOW

YOW! 2017 Sydney Day 1

Thu, Dec 7
Timezone: Australia/Sydney (AEST)
08:00

    Registration for YOW! 2017 Sydney - 45 mins

08:45

    Session Overviews & Introductions - 15 mins

09:00
10:00

    Morning Break - 30 mins

10:30
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    Brian LeRoux

    Brian LeRoux - Architecture as Text: Setup AWS Lambda, API Gateway, SNS, and DynamoDB on Easy Mode

    schedule  10:30 - 11:20 AM place Red Room people 223 Interested star_halfRate

    With functions as a service, cloud providers have signaled the smallest billable unit of computation is a single function execution. It’s a beautifully simple idea, rejecting the metaphor of a server, and freeing developers to design smaller and simpler services. We can iterate on our code with a high degree of isolation, without fear of affecting other parts of the system; deploy systems in seconds with zero downtime; and always be available regardless of load.

    However, building serverless-y apps is very new and as such fought with early days complexity:

    • Configuration tooling was designed for the last generation of computing metaphors (and often lags behind the releases of new functionality)
    • AWS is massive and overwhelming with many similar, but not the same, products
    • The web console is confusing, with divergent interfaces between interlocking services
    • Deep proprietary knowledge is required to configure and maintain common infrastructure primitives

    In this talk Brian will walk you through a new approach to architecting applications with plain text using arc.codes to create apps in minutes and subsequently deploy in seconds with zero downtime and unprecedented availability.

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    Ondrej Lehecka

    Ondrej Lehecka - Delivering LiveQueries via LiveServer

    schedule  10:30 - 11:20 AM place Green Room people 118 Interested star_halfRate

    Facebook has been using GraphQL queries to build rich user experience on web and mobile. User interface updated in real time as other users interact with the system plays a key role in driving user engagement. LiveQueries is an API to allow building interactive user interface, update client caches, push updates to the client in the background and more. It allows subscribing to the query result and receive updates as the query result changes.

    LiveServer is a stateful back-end for LiveQueries which interacts with query execution engine and reactive data sources. It uses dependency tracking and query re-execution to send updated query results to the client. It also allows delayed query execution and application of strategies for failed client message deliveries. Client and server is using long living connections and RSocket application protocol to deal with subscriptions, bi-directional streams, flow control and connection resumability.

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    Tony Morris

    Tony Morris - Functional Programming in Aviation

    schedule  10:30 - 11:20 AM place Blue Room people 110 Interested star_halfRate

    In this talk, we have a look at some of the low-hanging problems in general aviation and how functional programming can be applied to provide significant improvements in efficiency and air safety. The current solutions to problems such as navigation, traffic/terrain collision avoidance and weight/balance calculations will be demonstrated to the audience, mostly for amusement. More seriously, we will have a look at the legacy that has led to the way things are, and how to improve by applying our programming skills.

    We will look at:

    • how aviation safety is regulated.
    • how aeronautical services are provided to flight operators.
    • how aeronautical navigation is conducted and regulated.
    • how the weight and balance for a flight is conducted.
    • the methods by which aircraft and ground coordinate between each other.

    We will see:

    • some real (and basic) data management problems in aviation, that very obviously threaten safety, then solve them, using programming.
    • we will see a live demonstration of aeronautical navigation methods, investigate incident reports where lives were lost as a result, and consider how our programming skills can yield improvements, possibly even save lives.
    • we will conduct a real weight&balance calculation for a flight, then once hilarity inevitably ensues, we will look at the problems that arise by this method, then solve them using data structures and functional programming. Some of these practical problems are obvious, even to a non-aviator, and the predictable incident reports are the end result.
    • finally, we will have a look at a live demonstration of a software defined radio (SDR), receiving ADS-B transmissions from aircraft (live), an AHRS implementation and GNSS receiver using off-the-shelf, low-cost parts. We will look at why these instruments are helpful to aircraft pilots and interact with that device using the Haskell programming language.
11:30
12:20

    Lunch Break - 60 mins

13:20
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    Phil Calçado

    Phil Calçado - The Next Generation of Microservices

    schedule  01:20 - 02:10 PM place Red Room people 232 Interested star_halfRate

    How are microservices in 2017 different from how we used to build them at the beginning of the decade?

    More traditional Service-Oriented Architectures were defined by protocols and standards published and curated by industry consortiums. Knowledge of the architectural style usually called "microservices", on the other hand, is often in the form of patterns, cautionary tales, and tools extracted from real-world reports and software made available by organisations that have adopted this style.

    Almost ten years since the first wave of such reports, the landscape has changed considerably. Many hard challenges from the past have been eased or completely solved, and a lot of the custom software created by the microservices pioneers have been made off-the-shelf open source software.

    In this talk, Phil Calçado will contrast what we first found in the first generation of microservices architectures against the current generation's landscape. Let's talk about which previous common knowledge and patterns are deprecated, which ones are still active, and introduce some of the ones that have been recently added to our toolbox.

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    Jim Webber

    Jim Webber - Mixing Causal Consistency and Asynchronous Replication for Large Neo4j Clusters

    schedule  01:20 - 02:10 PM place Green Room people 38 Interested star_halfRate

    In this talk we’ll explore the new Causal clustering architecture for Neo4j. We’ll see how Neo4j uses the Raft protocol for a robust underlay for intensive write operations, and how the asynchronous new scale-out mechanism provides enormous capacity for very demanding graph workloads.

    We’ll discuss the cluster architecture’s new causal consistency model. Causal consistency is a big leap forward compared to the commonplace eventual consistency which makes it convenient to write applications that use the full capacity of the cluster. In particular we’ll show how despite the mixture of concensus protocols and asynchronous replication, that Neo4j allows users to read their own writes straightforwardly and discuss why this is such a difficult achievement in distributed systems.

    For the application developer, we’ll show how Neo4j’s Causal Clustering optimised drivers makes it easy to write applications that scale smoothly from a single server to a large, distributed cluster: a practical motivation for the distributed systems enthusiast.

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    Ken Scambler

    Ken Scambler - Adopting FP: A Human-First Approach

    schedule  01:20 - 02:10 PM place Blue Room people 78 Interested star_halfRate

    Functional programming has made great strides in the popular imagination, yet adoption of FP languages has often been challenging for companies, sputtering in fits and starts. Ken has been at the forefront of REA's successful adoption of FP over four years, and will share lessons learnt and traps avoided: how a human-first approach can succeed and scale.

14:20
15:10

    Afternoon Break - 30 mins

15:40
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    David Hussman

    David Hussman - Learning in Product: How Wrong are You Ready to Be?

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Red Room people 108 Interested star_halfRate

    While many Scrum teams talk proudly about progress, fewer engage is rich discuss about product. Many teams who become more confident in progress, or getting work done, often embrace the more ambiguous question of product, or “Are we meeting the needs of our customers”, with some customers buying, by paying for subscriptions, and others buying in, by showing (and glowing about) their use of the system.

    In this session, I’ll share experiences helping companies adopt a customer and product / services approach. From small digital product companies to large enterprises who are IT focused, I will present an approach for moving to or augmenting an existing move towards impact driven work.

    Topics that will be covered include: mapping teams to products and services, early product discovery, blending product discovery and product delivery, and if there is enough time, ideas for doing these things at scale. If we run out of time, there is always the hallways, where some of the best conversations take place. Feel free to stop me and chat me up. All I ask is that you bring your curiosity and skepticism, but leave any cynicism behind.

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    Julie Pitt

    Julie Pitt - Machines that Learn Through Action: The Future of AI

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Green Room people 231 Interested star_halfRate

    Deep Learning has led to breakthroughs in many previously unsolved problem domains, from image classification to machine translation to medical imaging analysis. Venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz recently cooked up an AI playbook, which posits that AI will impact software as broadly as relational databases have since the late 20th century. It’s hard to think of a technological problem that AI doesn’t touch.

    In this talk, we will explore the limits of today’s most popular approaches to AI. In particular, what kinds of problems can’t we solve today and how might the solutions shape the way we approach software development? Training a model for your particular domain is easier than ever, but why is it so difficult to make sense of what is going on inside the model? How can we move toward a more intuitive and accessible model for understanding what our AI has learned?

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    James Lewis

    James Lewis - Betting On Performance: A Note on Hypothesis Driven Performance Testing

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Blue Room people 112 Interested star_halfRate

    We often think of performance testing as one of those things we just have to do at the end of a project, often using heavyweight tool sets in dedicated environments.
    In this talk, James offers an alternative. What decisions would we make differently if we had the ability to rapidly perform experiments using lightweight performance tests? The tools and techniques we now have available makes a new type of architectural decision making possible; from Software Defined Networking, IaaS and Continuous Delivery to Real Options and Architecture Decision Records.James will cover pre-requisites that allow us to make small bets on performance and explore the strange world of evolutionary design that this technique makes possible.

16:40
17:45
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    Dave Farley

    Dave Farley - Taking Back “Software Engineering”: Craftsmanship is not Enough

    schedule  05:45 - 06:45 PM place Red Room people 210 Interested star_halfRate

    Would you fly in a plane designed by a craftsman or would you prefer your aircraft to be designed by engineers? Engineering is the application of iterative, empirical, practical science to real-world problems. Craftsmanship is a wonderful thing, and as a reaction to the terrible abuses of the term Engineering in software development Software Craftsmanship has helped in our learning of what really works.

    The term "Software Engineering" has gained a bad reputation. It implies "Big up-front design" and "Mathematically provable models" in place of working code. However, that is down to our interpretation, not a problem with "Engineering" as a discipline.

    In recent years we have discovered what really works in software development. Not everyone practices approaches like Continuous Delivery, but it is widely seen as representing the current state-of-the-art in software development. This is because at its root CD is about the application of an iterative, practical, empirical, maybe even science based approach to solving problems in software development. Is this a form of software engineering?

    Software isn't bridge-building, it is not car or aircraft development either, but then neither is Chemical Engineering, neither is Electrical Engineering. Engineering is different in different disciplines. Maybe it is time for us to begin thinking about retrieving the term "Software Engineering" maybe it is time to define what our "Engineering" discipline should entail.

18:45

    Conference Drinks & Networking - 60 mins

YOW! 2017 Sydney Day 2

Fri, Dec 8
Timezone: Australia/Sydney (AEST)
08:45

    Session Overviews & Introductions - 15 mins

09:00
10:00

    Morning Break - 30 mins

10:30
11:30
12:20

    Lunch Break - 60 mins

13:20
14:20
15:10

    Afternoon Break - 30 mins

15:40
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    Doc Norton

    Doc Norton - The Technical Debt Trap

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Red Room people 135 Interested star_halfRate

    Technical Debt has become a catch-all phrase for any code that needs to be re-worked. Much like refactoring has become a catch-all phrase for any activity that involves changing code. These fundamental misunderstandings and comfortable yet mis-applied metaphors have resulted in a plethora of poor decisions. What is technical debt? What is not technical debt? Why should we care? What is the cost of misunderstanding? What do we do about it?

    Doc discusses the origins of the metaphor, what it means today, and how we properly identify and manage technical debt. In this talk I’ll share how these four principles power world-famous companies and how they can help you work with greater speed, simplicity, safety and success.

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    Mike Amundsen

    Mike Amundsen - Twelve Patterns for Evolvable Web APIs

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Green Room people 230 Interested star_halfRate

    The speed of feature release for web and mobile apps continues to increase, but it can grow costly and time consuming to constantly rebuild and redeploy client applications—especially through app stores, where updates can take more than a week to appear. What if you could add new features to an existing client without repeatedly installing new versions of the application? What would the code look like? What changes are needed to create a client that can adapt to changes in the service API? How much change is reasonably possible when both the client and API are able to evolve over time?

    Mike Amundsen offers 12 patterns and practices for building APIs that can safely evolve over time and client applications that can adapt to those changes without relying on explicit versioning systems or repeated redeployment. Whether you are responsible for building web front-ends or APIs to serve those apps, Mike helps you identify key principles to increase the adaptability and evolvability of your web implementations.

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    Chanuki Illushka Seresinhe

    Chanuki Illushka Seresinhe - Quantifying the Influence of Beautiful Environments on Human Well-Being

    schedule  03:40 - 04:30 PM place Blue Room people 53 Interested star_halfRate

    Does spending time in beautiful settings boost people’s happiness? The answer to this question has long remained elusive due to a paucity of large-scale data on environmental aesthetics and individual happiness. Here, we draw on two novel datasets: first, individual happiness data from the smartphone app, Mappiness, and second, crowdsourced ratings of the “scenicness” of photographs taken across England, from the online game Scenic-Or-Not. We find that individuals are happier in more scenic locations, even when controlling for a range of factors such as the activity the individual is engaged in at the time, weather conditions and the income of local inhabitants.

    However, what might these beautiful places be comprised of? Is beauty in this context synonymous with nature? We extract hundreds of image features from over 200,000 Scenic-Or-Not images using the Places Convolutional Neural Network to understand the composition of beautiful places. We also find that a neural network can be trained to automatically identify scenic places, including both natural and built locations.

16:45
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    Gregor Hohpe

    Gregor Hohpe - Enterprise Architecture = Architecting the Enterprise?

    schedule  04:45 - 05:45 PM place Red Room people 276 Interested star_halfRate

    Architects in the enterprise are often regarded as ivory tower residents who bestow their utopian plans upon project teams in the form of colorful diagrams that bear little to no resemblance to reality. The most suspicious in this group are often the “Enterprise Architects” who are perceived as being furthest from actual technical problems.

    However, large-scale IT operation and transformation require transparency across hundreds or thousands of applications running on all sorts of middleware in data centers around the globe. The very enterprise architects are likely the only ones who stand a chance to bring transparency into such an environment and who can direct IT investments in the hundreds of millions of Euros towards modernization and run-cost reduction. This sounds a lot more exciting and valuable than drawing pictures!

    This session takes a serious but light-hearted look at the role of enterprise architects in modern IT organizations.

17:45

    Closing Drinks - 45 mins