A Smart Regional Management Platform for Sunshine Coast Council

[ui!] the urban institute has been working with Sunshine Coast Council to deliver a smart regional management platform for the city. This exercise raises several interesting questions:

  • What kinds of goals is the city trying to achieve by deploying a smart regional management platform?
  • What existing data does the city have (eg in their ERP systems) that aligns with these goals?
  • What new data does the city need (eg from deployed sensor arrays) to achieve the goals?
  • How should a smart city platform bring all this data together?
  • What are the organisational hurdles that need to be overcome to achieve a smart city vision?

This case study is a typical instance of the journey that a technology team need to go on to deliver a smart city solution, where just about everything is still alpha or beta quality, and the goalposts continually move as the stakeholders learn what's possible. Some stand-out challenges included:

  • Issues with different IoT sensor hardware and data integration (how to get data out consistently, security issues, API issues, etc)
  • Compliance/conformance issues around rapidly-emerging hardware, and conflicts with local Australian/New Zealand standards
  • Platform flexibility and configurability

The project combines data from twelve different data sources:

  • Solar farm
  • Environmental sensors (three different types)
  • Smart street lighting system
  • Irrigation system including data from the city's flood monitoring network and the bureau of meteorology
  • Public Wifi
  • Customer order/requests CRM
  • Public transport
  • Smart parking
  • Pedestrian counting
  • Cyclist counting

The talk will walk through the history of the project, from first trials to current implementation status, and explain challenges confronted and overcome.

 
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Outline/Structure of the Case Study

Explanation of the problem - what is the city trying to achieve?

The technologies used (IoT, legacy, platform)

Challenges - technology

Challenges - organisational

Current state & future plans.

Learning Outcome

Insights into the challenges that need to be overcome to build a smart city solution - from the challenges around the hardware deployed through the platform that integrates the data and delivers the solution.

Target Audience

Technologists working in (or thinking of getting into) the smart city space. City officials looking to build out smart city solutions.

Prerequisites for Attendees

Some exposure to IoT technology in the city space (eg environmental sensors, smart parking, smart lighting, etc) would be useful but not necessary.

schedule Submitted 8 months ago

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