How to Experiment Quickly

The ‘science’ in data science refers to the underlying philosophy that you don’t know what works for your business until you make changes and rigorously measure impact. Rapid experimentation is a fundamental characteristic of high functioning data science teams. They experiment with models, business processes, user interfaces, marketing strategies, and anything else they can get their hands on. In this talk I will discuss what data platform tooling and organizational designs support rapid experimentation in data science teams.

 
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Target Audience

Anyone involved in data science or building tools to support data scientists that are interested in enabling data science teams to run more experiments.

schedule Submitted 3 weeks ago

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